↑ Return to Sixth Form

Subjects

Art and Design

A Level Art and Design - AQA - 7201-6

 

Entry requirements:

Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.

Average GCSE point score 4.5 or above.

C grade at GCSE Art or equivalent portfolio of work.

COURSE CONTENT

Introduction course – Using sketchbooks, drawing skills and material development.

There are many study areas which are covered in the two components; thematic enquiry, expressive study, contextual study, problem solving and personal interest are just a few.

There is also a written element at A2 level.

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

·         Practical skills involved in recording and developing ideas in a range of appropriate media, techniques and processes

·         Critical analysis of evaluation of images and artefacts

·         Independent research

·         Expression and interpretation of ideas and feelings in visual and other form

Assessment takes place in May at the end of the AS and A2 course, with moderation in June.

Controlled test towards the end of the AS year and in the A2 year.

Tutors will feedback verbally in the form of tutorials, usually once a week/fortnight.  Each lesson, students are assessed verbally.  At the end of each project a formal written assessment is given plus a tutorial. Students are asked to use peer assessment and self-assessment to aid learning.  Students must devote at least four hours of home study per week to the course and they can also come to Art in study time.

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

You will need an A1 portfolio (or equivalent carry tube), an A3 sketchpad, colour materials e.g. pastel, pencils and some basic paints.  This is mainly for homework.

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

Any form of art and design courses such as fine art, sculpture, graphics design, product design, fashion design, textiles, and architecture or furniture design.  There are over 100 career pathways such as interior design, set design, game designer, special effect related careers, jobs in marketing and advertising.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss F. Bailey, Townsend Church of England School

Biology

The following topics are studied in A level Biology

Module 1 Development of Practical skills

This unit includes the practical endorsement and is worked on throughout the two years of the course.

 

Year 12 Teaching Topics

Module 2: Foundations in Biology

  • Cell Structure
  • Biological molecules
  • Nucleotides and Nucleic acids
  • Enzymes
  • Biological Membranes
  • Cell division and Organisation

Module 3: Exchange and Transport

  • Exchange and transport in animals and plants

Module 4: Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease

  • Disease and the immune system
  • Classification and Evolution
  • Biodiversity

 

Year 13 teaching topics

Module 5: Communication, Homeostasis and Energy

  • Communication and homeostasis
  • Excretion
  • Animal Responses
  • Plant Responses and hormones
  • Photosynthesis
  • Respiration

Module 6: Genetics, Evolution and Ecosystems

  • Cellular control
  • Patterns of inheritance
  • Evolution
  • Manipulating genomes
  • Cloning and Biotechnology
  • Ecosystems
  • Populations and Sustainability

During year 13 pupils have the opportunity to complete the field study areas of the course and practical endorsements at the Crandedale Centre in Yorkshire. This is a compulsory trip that takes place in October. On the course pupils will learn a range of skills and use equipment that is unavailable to us at School as well as study habitats such as Rocky Shores and Moorland that we cannot access here. Whilst there we use this opportunity to study aspects of unit 6 in a practical setting including Ecosystems and Populations by comparing data collected during the day and Sustainability when looking at sustainable forestry and fishing.

Cranedale centre: http://www.cranedale.com/ )

Recommended reading and websites:

Text books:

Many second hand copies are available on Amazon and are usually in very good condition

Revision Guides:

  • CGP A Level Biology for OCR
  • CGP Head start to A Level Biology
  • CGP A Level Biology: Essential Maths Skills

All these books are available to purchase from your Biology Teachers

Websites:

Business Studies

Business A Level - AQA -  7132

Entry requirements:

  • Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.
  • Average GCSE point score 4.5 or above.
  • Grade C for GCSE Mathematics.

Students who have just failed to meet these requirements may be allowed to start the course at the discretion of the Head of Department.

COURSE CONTENT

Business Studies is about management and enterprise.  It looks at how businesses are created, develop, grow, survive crisis and perhaps eventually decline.  It focuses on the people whose skills affect this process and uses theory to analyse the causes and effects of different management approaches.

At both AS and A2 students learn about how businesses are organised, financed and operated.  A2 builds on the knowledge and concepts learnt at AS.  Key emphasis is placed on the interdependence of the functional areas as well as the relevance of the theory studied to real life business situations in modern Britain

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

Wide ranges of learning styles are used to develop in students the skills of analysis and evaluation.  The emphasis though is on learning through case study material that reflects more closely those issues faced by firms.  Past papers are used to coach students in exam technique and assess progress.  Assessment is through external exams. The examination formats themselves are a mixture of data response, extended response and applying numerical skills.

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

Students need to be prepared to study independently and use all the resources available to them both in and out of the classroom.

A major commitment should be to take particular notice of current business news through the regular reading of the financial section of a quality newspaper and/or watching the news and other relevant business programs.

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

Business Studies gives students a preparation for future careers in: Marketing, Human Resource Management, Accounting and Operations Management.  It facilitates access to almost all higher education courses.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs C. Maguire, Townsend Church of England School

Chemistry

The following topics are studied in A level Chemistry

Module 1 Development of Practical skills

This unit includes the practical endorsement and is worked on throughout the two years of the course.

Year 12 Teaching Topics

Module 2: Foundations in Chemistry

  • Atomic structure and isotopes
  • Compounds formulae and equations
  • Amount of substance
  • Electron structure
  • Bonding and structure
  • Acids
  • Redox
  • Enthalpy changes

Module 3: Inorganic and Physical Chemistry

  • Periodicity
  • Group 2
  • The Halogens
  • Qualitative analysis
  • Reaction rates
  • Chemical Equilibrium

Module 4: Organic Chemistry

  • Alkanes
  • Alkenes
  • Alcohols
  • Haloalkanes
  • Organic synthesis
  • Analytical techniques
  • Organic synthesis
  • Analytical techniques

Year 13 teaching topics

Module 5: Physical and Inorganic Chemistry

  • How Fast (Rates)
  • How Far (Equilibria)
  • Acids, bases and buffers
  • Lattice enthalpy
  • Entropy
  • Redox and Electrode Potentials
  • Transition elements
  • Qualitative analysis

Module 6: Organic Chemistry

  • Aromatic Compounds
  • Carbonyl compounds
  • Carboxylic acids and esters
  • Amines
  • Amino acids, amides and chirality
  • Polyesters and polyamides
  • Carbon-carbon bond formation
  • Organic Synthesis
  • Chromatography and qualitative analysis
  • Spectroscopy

Recommended reading and websites:

Text books:

  • Rob Ritchie and Dave Gent: A Level Chemistry A for OCR Student Book - Publisher: OUP Oxford ISBN-10: 0198351976
  • Eileen Ramsden A-Level Chemistry - Core Text Fourth Edition - Publisher: Nelson Thornes; ISBN-10: 0748752994
  • Lawrie Ryan Advanced Chemistry For You - Publisher: OUP Oxford; 2 edition (28 May 2015) ISBN-10: 1408527367

Magazine/Journals:

  • Scientific American
  • New Scientist

Websites:

http://www.periodicvideos.com

http://www.sixtysymbols.com

http://www.rsc.org/learn-chemistry

English Literature

AQA English Literature - 7717

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • Six or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.
  • Average GCSE point score 5.0 or above.
  • Grade 5  in English Literature GCSE.

COURSE CONTENT

The AS course focuses on ‘Aspects of Tragedy’. A wide range of rich and powerful texts are studied including the plays, ‘Othello’ and ‘Death of a Salesman’, the novel ‘The Great Gatsby’ and the poetry of Keats. It is vital that students are prepared to read around the subject in order to achieve success in the subject. A2 offers the opportunity for students to build on the skills acquired at AS and develop a deeper understanding of English Literature. At A2, there is a coursework component as well as an exam component.

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

Considerable emphasis is placed upon class discussion. Independent study is also  encouraged.  Opportunities for student presentations are frequent and popular.

  • AS: p.1: one Shakespeare play and one other drama text. 1 hour 30 minutes. Closed book.
  • AS: p. 2:one prose and one poetry text. 1 hour 30 minutes. Open book.
  • A2: study of three texts. One post-2000 prose text; one poetry and one further text,
  • One of which one must be written pre-1900. Exam will include an unseen passage. 3 hours. Open book.
  • A2: Non-exam assessment: two essays each responding to a different text.

Students should keep a reading log of novels and poems read during the Summer break which precedes the onset of the course.

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

As English Literature expects students to think and discuss the texts and ask questions, students are expected to do their own reading and research about texts and authors studied.  They must learn to study independently and realise that study at this level is a huge step up from GCSE.  Students are expected to attend external lectures and theatre trips and visits outside school as appropriate.

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

English Literature lends itself to a wide range of careers including: media, journalism, publishing and teaching. It is a strong university favourite as English Literature shows that students can communicate effectively in writing and discussion.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss P. Noble, Townsend Church of England School

French

A Level French - Edexcel - 9FR01

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

 - Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.

 - Average GCSE point score 5.0 or above.

 - Grade B or above at GCSE French, including a B grade in the reading and writing exams.

COURSE CONTENT

At AS level, you will study topics covered at GCSE in more detail and students will have the opportunity to extend their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing through the study of materials related to contemporary France and Francophone countries. Topics included are the family, leisure, education, the media, the environment, immigration and multiculturalism.

At A2 level, students continue to develop their competence in language and explore further social, cultural and political issues.  In addition, a literary text or topic may be studied.

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

Grammar is taught both on its own and through language topics.  The topics are presented and explored through spoken and written texts and exercises leading to discussion and written assignments.  In the oral exam, students will research and present a topic of their choice from the listed modules.  Literature, if studied, is analysed in class through essays written in French.

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

You will be expected to work hard and keep to deadlines. 

Students should have an interest in one of the French speaking countries and/or be informed about its history, culture and current events.

Students should preferably have also made a visit to the country concerned and may have the opportunity to take part in a work experience programme in France.

Students must attend conversation lessons, as well as have the self-discipline to learn vocabulary and master French grammar.

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

Knowledge of a foreign language could be the passport to many careers.  Most university courses offer languages as a subsidiary subject.

The ability to understand and use French is also a desirable skill in such areas of work as economics and business, marketing, public relations, engineering, tourism, law, education and many more.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mr S. Grzesiczek, Townsend Church of England School

Further Mathematics

GCE Mathematics (Further) – An additional Qualification - Edexcel 8372

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Six or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.

Average GCSE point score 5.2 or above.

A minimum of grade B in GCSE Mathematics achieved in the Higher level examination.

 

COURSE CONTENT

The full course is made up of three modules.

All students have to study the Further Pure Mathematics 1 module but can choose two other

modules from Statistics, Mechanics, Decision Mathematics or additional modules in Further Pure

Mathematics. A range of mathematical concepts and methods studied as part of the AS/A2

Mathematics course are developed further and studying Further Mathematics alongside

Mathematics will aid understanding and performance.

 

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

Students will learn in a small group and develop their mathematical skills and knowledge through teacher instruction, structured practice and group discussion.

There will also be opportunities to use a variety of ICT techniques and software to understand and visualise the concepts.

The course is assessed through written examinations in Further Pure Mathematics and the two other chosen modules.

 

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

Students are expected to study independently and read further into the concepts. It is essential that students spend the necessary time practising methods to the point that they have the confidence to apply their own knowledge to a variety of problems.

 

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

Further Mathematics is an excellent qualification for those who wish to study Mathematics or other numerate subjects at degree level. It will help to improve students' chances and choices when seeking places at University or in employment. It will also help to develop a deeper

understanding of the topics in the AS/A2 Mathematics, resulting in improved problem solving skills and examination performance.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs A. Berry, Townsend Church of England School

 

Geography

A LEVEL Geography - AQA - 7037

The specification we have chosen to study "offers an issues-based approach to studying geography, enabling students to explore and evaluate contemporary geographical questions and issues such as the consequences of globalisation, responses to hazards, water insecurity and climate change" (Edexcel Specification 2016).

Students will also gain the chance to complete 4 days worth of fieldwork in order to write a piece of coursework up to 4000 words, this will make up 20% of their final grade.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.
  • Average GCSE point score 4.7 or above.
  • Grade C or above in Geography GCSE.

COURSE CONTENT

The full course is divided into a number of topics split between units studied over two years.  The topics cover a wide area of physical and human geography along with other geographical skills.

Topics include; hazards, contemporary urban environments, coasts, global systems, changing places, hot desert environments, population and the environment.  The course also develops geographical skills, including statistical analysis tests, extended writing and fieldwork.

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

Fieldwork and theoretical work is integrated into the teaching through discussions, case studies and decision-making exercises, as well as a week-long field course in year 12.

The course is assessed through written examination and structured writing.  Extended prose questions are common to all of the units.  One examination in both AS and A2 is focussed on statistics and geographical skills.  Students will be expected to carry out fieldwork on a field trip to answer skills based questions in the examination.

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

The course covers a large range of topics in the first year.  Hard work, enthusiasm and commitment to study independently and the use of all resources available is therefore required.  Students are expected to write answers to a considerable number of exam questions and essays in order to practice their techniques.

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

Advanced level Geography develops essential transferable skills for many careers and is favoured by Universities due to the wide skills base the subject develops.

It is essential for those wishing to follow courses in environmental sciences.  It is also useful for careers such as environmental management, surveying, architecture, transport, retailing, tourism and journalism as well as many more subject specific jobs, such as oceanography, volcanology and demographic studies and development related work.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs M. Buckland or Mrs C Elliott, Townsend Church of England School

History

History A Level EDEXCEL 9HI0

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.

Average GCSE point score 4.5 or above.

Students will need a GCSE grade C or above in History or, if not studied at GCSE, a grade C in a related subject.  Most importantly, students will need an interest in History.

 

COURSE CONTENT

The course is linked through the themes of changing democracies from the eighteenth century to modern day.  Students will study Britain transformed 1918-1997; the conformity and challenge in the USA 1955-92, Poverty, public health and the state in Britain c1780-1939 and coursework on a historical controversy. The course will also draw on a greater depth and range of content, demonstrate a deeper understanding of historical concepts, develop analysis and judgements that are more effectively substantiated, carry out a historical enquiry that is independently researched and that investigates specific historical questions.

 

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

Lessons use a range of learning methods such as the use of primary and secondary evidence, discussion work, historical enquiries, group tasks and presentations.  Independent research and written tasks will also be involved.

Students are tested on knowledge, essays, responses to documents from the time, group and individual research tasks and oral presentations.

Papers 1, 2 and 3 will be assessed through written examination.  Unit 4 will be assessed through the completion of a piece of coursework at the end of year 13.

 

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

Students are expected to be committed to their studies and to be making progress to meet the demands of A level History.

Students will be required to take an active role in lessons, meet deadlines and carry out independent research. Enthusiasm, curiosity, and willingness to debate is required.

 

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

History combines well with most subjects and is highly respected by all universities. It requires the development of the communication of ideas and an understanding of the views of others, analysis and interpretation of evidence and investigative research skills.

Employers look favourably on these skills in almost any line of work.  Occupations such as law, journalism, education and policing are just some of the areas where History is particularly important.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs J. Bailey, Townsend Church of England School

 

Mathematics

A Level Mathematics - Edexcel - 9371

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.
  • Average GCSE point score 5.2 or above.
  • A minimum of grade B in GCSE Mathematics achieved in the Higher level examination.

COURSE CONTENT

Year 12 - Core 1 (C1), Core 2 (C2)  and Statistics 1  (S1)
  • C1:  Algebra and functions; coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane; sequences and series; differentiation; integration
  • C2:  Algebra and functions; coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane; sequences and series; trigonometry; exponentials and logarithms; differentiation, integration
  • S1: Statistical modelling; presenting and analysing data; probability; correlation and regression; discrete random variables; discrete distributions; the Normal distribution
 Year 13 – Core 3 (C3),  Core 4 (C4) and Mechanics 1 (M1)
  • C3:  Algebra and functions; trigonometry; exponentials and logarithms; differentiation and numerical methods
  • C4:  Algebra and functions; coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane; sequences and series; differentiation; integration; vectors
  • M1:   Mathematical models; vectors; kinematics of a particle moving in a straight line; dynamics of a particle moving in a straight line or plane; statics of a particle; moments

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

  • Five hours a week in lessons plus homework and private study time.
  • You will be encouraged to develop independent learning skills through problem solving and research. There will be opportunities for directed learning and class discussion to enable you to develop the correct mathematical knowledge and techniques.
  • Assessment is through three module examinations in each of the two years of the course.
  • The papers are equally weighted and each is ninety minutes long.

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

To work with interest and determination throughout the course.

Students will be set a variety of homework tasks which will usually require them to demonstrate that they can fully apply their mathematical knowledge.  They will also be expected to research and investigate some areas of maths by themselves.  The best maths students will be self-motivated to acquire a deeper knowledge of the subject.

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

Mathematics is the most sought after qualification by universities and employers as it shows them you have an analytical mind.  Mathematics is important for many careers, including finance, economics, engineering, teaching, information technology, architecture, psychology and scientific research.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs A. Berry, Townsend Church of England School

Media Studies

A Level Media Studies - AQA 2570

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.

Average GCSE point score 4.5 or above.

An interest in the media and the technologies that create the products.

 

COURSE CONTENT

Learning to research and analyse media texts; and to create media texts with a target audience.                                Year 12 (3 units)

A critical research assignment, media debates issues and creating media products.     Year 13 (3 units)

 

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

Students are introduced to key concepts through the study of media texts and are introduced to the language of the subject in both practical and analytical assignments.  Students use ICT to create products and to present their work.  Students are encouraged to form and express opinions and discussion is a feature of their learning.  Students are assessed as follows:

• A practical production with supporting log, an hour and a quarter examination on how to read the media and an hour and a half examination on textual topics in the media.

Year 12

• An independent study of a media product, an hour and a half written paper on texts in their context and an hour and a half critical analysis examination focusing on a comparison of media products.                                                                                                Year 13

 

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

This course is demanding in terms of:

• research

• planning and organisation

• intellectual and practical skills

• independent thinking

 

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

The media is one of the fastest growing areas of the economy and media studies combines well with a number of other courses at universities.  As well as subject specific skills, students may also develop leadership skills, organisational skills, cooperative working practices, vision and innovation, taking concept to product and ICT skills.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss E. Scott, Townsend Church of England School

 

Physics

The following topics are studied in A level Physics

Module 1 Development of Practical skills

This unit includes the practical endorsement and is worked on throughout the two years of the course.

Year 12 Teaching Topics

Module 2: Foundations in Physics

  • Quantities and units
  •  Derived units
  • Scalar and vector quantities
  • Adding vectors
  • Resolving vectors
  •  More on vectors

Module 3: Forces and motion

  • Motion
  • Forces in action
  • Work, energy, and power
  • Materials
  • Laws of motion and momentum

Module 4: Electrons, waves, and photons

  • Charge and current
  • Energy, power and resistance
  • Electrical circuits
  • Waves 1
  • Waves 2
  • Quantum physics

Year 13 teaching topics

Module 5: Newtonian world and astrophysics

  • Thermal physics
  •  Ideal gases
  •  Circular motion
  • Oscillations
  • Gravitational fields
  • Stars
  • Cosmology

Module 6: Particles and medical physics

  • Capacitance
  • Electric fields
  • Magnetic fields
  • Particle physics
  • Radioactivity
  • Nuclear physics
  • Medical imaging

Recommended reading and websites:

Text books:

Revision Guides:

  • CGP Head start to A Level Physics
  • CGP A Level Physics: Essential Maths Skills
  • CGP A Level Physics for OCR

All these books are available to purchase from your Physics Teachers

Websites:

Physical Education

Physical Education - H555 OCR

students will study A level PE across 2 years, covering the following modules:

  1. Physiological factors affecting performance

    This section includes applied anatomy and physiology, exercise physiology and biomechanics where students will learn how the body enables you to exercise and how it is affected by exercise. They will also gain a greater understanding on how developments in technology have led to improvements in performance.
    This will be assessed through a 2 hour written paper worth 90 marks
    It makes up 30% of the overall grade

  2. Psychological factors affecting performance

    This section includes skill acquisition and sport psychology where students will learn about how we develop skills and how different aspects such as personality and attitude can affect our performance.
    This will be assessed through a 1 hour written paper worth 60 marks
    It makes up 20% of the overall grade

  3. Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport

    This section includes sports and society and contemporary issues in physical activity and sport where students will learn about issues that affect participation, development and performance in sport around the World.
    This will be assessed through a 1 hour written paper worth 60 marks
    It makes up 20% of the overall grade

  4. Performance in physical education

    This section includes a practical performance assessment in 1 sport as either a performer or coach. Students must be taking part regularly in competitions in their sport outside of school. Students will also have to complete an Evaluation and Analysis of Performance for Improvement (EAPI), where students will watch a live performance, analyse the strengths and weaknesses and justify a suggested action plan to improve one aspect of their performance,
    This will be assessed through a practical moderation and a 20 minute oral presentation given directly after watching a performance. It's worth 60 marks
    It makes up 30% of the overall grade

Students will be expected to carry out extended reading around a number of topics and be up to date with current issues in sport.

Suggested Reading:

Useful Websites

Product Design

 GCE AS/A level Product Design (3d design) - OCR - H453

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.
  • Average GCSE point score 4.5 or above and Grade C or above in any Design & Technology option.

COURSE CONTENT

Design and Technology subjects are a way in which you can develop your creative, problem solving and analytical skills.  Nearly everything we own has a designer involved in its journey and the Product Design course has been designed to encourage candidates to take a broad view of technology and design, to develop their capacity to design and make products and to appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing.

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

The AS has two units:

  • F521: Advanced Innovation Challenge
    The Advanced Innovation challenge is a design challenge assessing candidates’ ability to design and model a product and then reflect on their design concept.
  • F522: Product Study
    The Product Study is a coursework unit.  It consists of product analysis and product development, prototype modelling and testing.

The A2 also has two units;

  • F523: Design, Make and Evaluate

    Candidates are required to produce a coursework portfolio and product that fully demonstrates their designing, making and evaluation skills using creativity, flair and invocation.  The coursework consists of designing, making, and evaluating a product, a marketing presentation, and a review and reflection.  This unit is intended to draw upon and develop skills learnt in other units.

  • F524: Product Design

    This is a written paper that consists of two components.  Candidates will be able to select questions across the focus material areas.

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

  • Students are expected to manage their project work in an increasingly autonomous way.
  • Reading around the subject, taking an interest in new innovation and technological activity are also expected.
  • Strong interest in designing, making and the ability to work independently.

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

Design & Technology subjects are useful for a wide variety of courses and career opportunities including Engineering, Architecture, Design/Graphics and Fashion Design and the skills used throughout the independent product study coursework element and the design, make and evaluate project lend themselves to a wide range of other subjects and courses including Art and Design, Product development, game and web design, furniture design and manufacture. These subjects develop key life skills and equip you with the knowledge and confidence with problem solving, experimenting and analysing.  Skills that you will use every day even if you decide not to pursue a design based activity as a career choice.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Head of Department: Mr D. Hill,

Psychology

A Level Psychology - AQA - 7182

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language.
  • Average GCSE point score 4.8 or above.
  • Grade C for GCSE Mathematics.
  • Good written skills, an enquiring mind, an interest in Science and the motivation to do your best. It is an academic course that you will find interesting, enjoyable and challenging.

COURSE CONTENT

Five hours a week in a lesson plus homework and private study time.

Psychology is defined as the scientific study of human behaviour and mental processes. It aims to describe, explain and predict human behaviour.

AS level
  • Unit 1: Memory, Attachment in children and Social influence
  • Unit 2: Abnormality, Approaches in Psychology and Research methods.
A2 level
  • Unit 3: Gender, Aggression, Schizophrenia
  • Unit 4: Issues and debates in Psychology.

Small practical projects will be a feature of the course but do not count towards A2 or AS grades.

LEARNING METHODS AND ASSESSMENT

Psychology is assessed solely through written examinations in the Summer Term.  You will need to be able to communicate well in writing and have a willingness to take on new vocabulary and concepts associated with the subject. You will also be encouraged to develop your skills of oral communication during lessons by way of short presentations to the group.

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS

A’ level Psychology is very content heavy. Essay writing is an essential part of the course.

Students must be prepared to study independently and use resources available to them in and outside the classroom.

CAREERS IMPLICATIONS

Psychology is a social science relevant to many careers, particularly in health, education, social care, marketing, advertising and business.  It is valued by employers and for entry into a wide range of courses in Higher Education.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mr J. Buckland, Townsend Church of England School

Religious Education

A Level Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics) - OCR - H573

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

  • Five or more GCSE grades at A*-C including English Language
  • Average GCSE point score 4.8 or above.
  • Students will also need a GCSE grade B or above in Religious Studies.
  • Students should have an interest and enthusiasm in exploring moral and religious issues.  An open enquiring outlook and willingness to use initiative and work hard are also required.

COURSE CONTENT

There are three units of study;

  • Philosophy of religion– ancient Greek philosophy, the problem of evil,  existence of God, religious experiences, symbol and myth, religious language, and life