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Key Stage 3

Year 7 Learning and Achievement Evening

 

Art & Design

Course Details

The course follows the Townsend Curriculum alongside the National Curriculum as a guide covering a range of topics throughout Years 7 and 8.


Course Description

The KS3 Art and Design Curriculum at Townsend encourages students to  develop their creativity and self expression. Students are able to develop these skills by using a wide variety of media, techniques and processes throughout year 7 and 8 ,building on prior learning from KS2. Through a knowledge rich curriculum students are introduced to range of different artists, art movements and cultures, learning about the impact of art and design on society and the wider world. The curriculum focuses on the key formal element of art through a range of different topic titles with each project aiming to build on prior learning from year 7 through to year 9.


Programme of Study

Students will work through three different topics and engage in practical tasks, discussion, group work and homework projects. Each theme is designed to develop a balance of practical skills, knowledge and understanding. Students will experiment with both 2D and 3D formats and explore techniques including painting, printing, collage and sculpture.

Year 7

Term 1

Baseline Test

  • Student do a baseline test in order to identify their individual starting points from prior learning. Accurate assessment of drawing skills, making skills, understanding of art and evaluation are all tested.
  • Baseline testing in Art and Design – Paul Carney (used for test)

Observational drawing / Still life - Vanitas project

  • In year 7 students begin to develop a more realistic style of drawing and are taught the importance of keen observation, accurate line and use of tone. Students are Introduced to the key formal element of art through drawing of the basic shapes developing up to a still life based on Dutch Vanitas paintings.

Term 2

Colour theory / animals - Franz Marc

  • Introduction to Colour theory, the colour wheel, colour mixing and paint application focusing on the theme of animals and the Expressionist artist Franz Marc.

Term 3

3D construction - Aboriginal art

  • In this 3D project, which has clear cross curricular links, students will learn about the Indigenous Aboriginal people of Australia, their lifestyle, beliefs and art work(SMSC). Students will create work which reflects these beliefs, developing drawing skills, their understanding of different painting techniques and mixed media in order to create their own 3D piece.

Year 8

Term 1

Baseline Test

  • Student do a baseline test in order to identify pupil’s individual starting points from prior learning in Year 7 to now. Accurate assessment of drawing skills, making skills, understanding of art and evaluation are all tested.

Portraiture - Cubism and Picasso

  • This project aims to cover the basic of portraiture. Students will be introduced to the history of portraiture and varying styles focusing of Cubism and Picasso. Through drawing activities students will developed their own final cubist inspired portrait.

Term 2

3D Fish - Surrealist fish-shoe project

  • This project focuses on developing students observational drawing skills further, focusing on the key formal elements of art. Students will also learn about Surrealism and two prominent artists in this movement, Salvador Dali and Rene Magritte. They will then develop design ideas and a final 3D outcome, the ‘fish-shoe’.

Term 3

Identity linking to the theme of Who Am I? - Pop Art

  • For the is project the focus is on self-identity. Student will take a look at who they are and what defines them as an individual. This project will have many cross curricular links as we look at beliefs and cultural identity too(SMSC) Students will learn about Pop Art and Pop Art artists which will inspire their own outcomes.

Assessment

Regular assessment of work is used to promote and improve learning. Students are assessed through formative, summative and peer assessment.


Home Learning

Students are given artist based research to complete in the form of extended projects.


Where can Art and Design take you

Further Study

  • GCSE Art
  • A Level Art
  • Fine Art
  • Art and Design
  • Graphic Communication
  • Textiles
  • 3-Dimensional Design

Careers

  • Artist
  • Interior Designer
  • Set Designer
  • Animator
  • Web Designer
  • Graphic Designer
  • Graphic Illustrator
  • Fine Artist
  • Commercial Artist
  • Museum Curator
  • Digital 3D Modeller
  • Video Games Designer

Student Art Guide - https://www.studentartguide.com/articles/art-careers-list


How parents can support their child's learning

  • To encourage them to continue to develop their skills in this subject outside of the classroom, utilising online videos as a means to practise and improve further.
  • Ask them about what they have been taught at school in order to reinforce prior learning.
  • To support them in improving their knowledge and understanding of different artists, craft persons and designers. This can be done through in-depth research and visits to see works of art first hand in museums and galleries, locally and in the wider area if possible.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

Miss F.Bailey, Head of Art Townsend, Church of England School

Computer Science

Course Details

The Computer Science course follows the National Curriculum, covering a series of topics across key stage 3.


Course Description

Program of study aimed at equipping students to use computational thinking for a digital world so that they;

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology

Programme of Study

Year 7 

Term 1

  • baseline assessment

Introduction to Townsend network / computational thinking

  • Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.
  • design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

Logic and data representation

  • Understand simple Boolean logic [for example, AND, OR and NOT] and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers [for example, binary addition, and conversion between binary and decimal]
  • Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits

Term 2

Digital Literacy - Collaborating online respectfully

  • Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.
  • Create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability

Term 3

Programming using Scratch and Kodu

  • use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems

Year 8

Term 1

  • Baseline assessment

Computer Systems

  • Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems,

HTML

  • Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems

UK Bebras

  • A yearly problem solving competition where students are given a series of challenging questions.  The top students that meet the required level, move on to the next challenge produced by Oxford University.

Term 2

Networks and communication

  • Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems and how they communicate with one another and with other systems

Matrix competition - Cyber-security

  • A regional competition to allow students to explore the world of cyber-security

Term 3

Programming (using Python)

  • use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures [for example, lists, tables or arrays]

IT project - phone apps

  • undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, preferably across a range of devices, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users
  • create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability

Assessment

The students work is continually assessed through informed observations, verbal questioning and some unit tests on special activities designed to judge progress.


Home Learning

Students are given a project based activity to complete based on the homework timetable that is set at the beginning of the year.


Where can Computer Studies take you

Any role involving problem solving

  • Computer Programmer
  • Software Developer
  • Hardware Engineer
  • Systems Manager
  • Web Developer
  • Software Engineer
  • Database Administrator
  • IT Architect
  • Network Administrator
  • Systems Analyst
  • Security Analyst
  • Information Researcher

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ask about the topics being covered.  What have they learnt?  Can they explain it to you?  Could they review using some online resources
  • Encourage your child to go through what has been learnt in the lesson.
  • Watch the news including click on the BBC channel to support understanding of new technology that is being introduced.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs H.King, Head of Computer Science, Townsend Church of England School

Design Technology

Course Details

Design and technology is a subject that encourages students to use their creativity and imagination to design and make products that solve real world problems within a variety of contexts. Students will need to consider the needs, wants and values of themselves and others. Design and technology gives students the opportunity to draw upon disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art.


Course Description

Students in Year 7 & 8 will rotate across 4 modules within Design and Technology:

  • Design and Technology (Timbers and Plastics)
  • Textiles
  • Engineering
  • Food

During each rotation students will engage in creative and practical activities and engage with an iterative process of designing and making.


Programme of Study

Students will learn how:

Designing:

  • To use research and exploration to identify user needs
  • To identify and solve design problems and how to reformulate problems given to them
  • To develop specifications
  • Use a variety of approaches to generate creative ideas
  • Develop and communicate design ideas

Making

  • To select from and use specialist tools, technique, processes, equipment and machinery
  • To select from and use a range of materials, components and ingredients, taking into account their properties

Evaluating

  • To analyse the work of past and present professionals
  • To investigate new and emerging technologies
  • To test, evaluate and refine ideas against a specification
  • To understand developments in design and technology, its impact on individuals, society and the environment

Technical Knowledge

  • To understand and use the properties of materials and performance of structural elements to achieve functioning solutions
  • To understand how more advanced mechanical systems used in their products enable changes in movement and force

During food modules students will learn how to cook as well as apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating.


Assessment

During each module students will be assessed in two ways.

  • Practical assessment: In each module students will complete a design and make activity. The practical outcome of this activity will be assessed.
  • End of Module Assessment: At the end of each module students will complete a written assessment in a lesson.

Home Learning

  • Students will be given one home learning activity per week which will be set on show my homework.
  • As part of their homework students will be asked to prepare ingredients they will need for their food lessons.
  • Ingredients lists for the whole module will be given to students and set on show my homework at the start of a module.

Where can Design Technology take you?

Further Study

  • GCSE Design and Technology
  • A Level Design and Technology: Product Design
  • Vocational Qualifications in areas such as building, computing, construction, design, engineering, fashion, manufacturing and textiles
  • Apprenticeships in areas such as building, CAD, construction, engineering, fashion and textiles, graphic design, manufacturing and planning
  • Degree courses in areas such as architecture , design and engineering

Careers

Many exciting careers require the practical and problem solving skills that D&T provides and the demand for people in these areas of work is growing.

  • Design
  • Manufacturing
  • Engineering

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mr D.Hill, Head of Design and Technology, Townsend Church of England School

Drama

Course Details and Description

Year 7

Students in year 7 will study many different and exciting units of work in their first year of Drama lessons. Each unit is designed to build key drama skills and allow students to explore different types of theatre whilst building their confidence and creativity. Within the first year students will build the two key skills needed for creating theatre: working with script and devising their own theatre.

Year 8

Students in year 8 will study many advanced and intriguing units of work designed to build upon the key drama skills gained in year 7, and allow students to explore different types of theatre whilst building their confidence and creativity. Within this second year of Drama students will start to be stretched and challenged to get them ready for the GCSE years ahead, the skills learned in Drama can also be very useful in many other subjects. Skills such as teamwork, creativity, time management and public speaking will be invaluable in later academic and personal life.


Programme of Study

Year 7

Introduction to Drama

  • Creating drama, teamwork and imagination, proxemics, voice, body language, gesture.

Pantomime

  • Comedy, characterisation, voice and body language

Wacky Soap

  • Life skills, substance abuse education, role playing, scenarios involving risk and consequence

Macbeth

  • Introduction to script, introduction to Shakespeare, blocking, directing, delivering lines

Terrible Fate

  • Anti-bullying, team work, empathy, analysing script, consequences and role play

Stage Combat

  • Correct physical technique for moves, directing, health and safety, proxemics, plot and structure of scene

Year 8

Introduction to Drama strategies

  • Narration, still image, cross-cutting, thought track, marking moment

Mask and Mime

  • Movement, gesture, mime, mask performance skills, proxemics, comedy

Warden X

  • Improvisation skills, confidence, imagination, team work, problem solving

Titanic

  • Intermediate stimuli skills; empathy, social, cultural, historical, political
  • Research skills; drama strategy

Commedia Dell'arte

  • Improvisation skills, confidence, imagination, team work, mask, comedy

Darkwood Manor

  • Storytelling, ghost stories, suspense, genre, team work, problem solving

Assessment

Year 7

Introduction to Drama

  • baseline assessment
  • progress assessment

Pantomime

  • Pantomime performance and self-evaluation

Wacky Soap

  • Devised performance based on role play

Macbeth

  • Scripted performance of one scene from a choice of three and self-evaluation

Terrible Fate

  • Devised performances from a scripted stimulus and self-evaluation

Stage Combat

  • devised choreography of own fight sequence relevant to story-line of scene and self-evaluation

Year 8

Introduction to Drama strategies

  • Devised scenario based performance and self-evaluation

Mask and Mime

  • Devised masked performance from 3 title choices and self-evaluation

Warden X

  • Continuous assessment of in lesson skills and student evaluation

Titanic

  • Devised mini drama's based on stimuli and self-evaluation

Commedia Dell'arte

  • Devised mini comedic pieces following Commedia tradition

Darkwood Manor

  • Devised performance and self-evaluation

Home Learning

In both year 7 & 8 project style home learning is used. These last 1 half term and involve weekly tasks to build up to a final project. Year 7 is a Shakespeare project and year 8 is a Perfect Play project.


Where can Drama take you

Drama is an excellent subject for transferable skills. Not only will these skills help you in other subjects but also in your future workplace, the life skills gained in Drama can be useful in many ways. Skills developed through Drama can be used in all aspects of work and life, such as:

  • imagination
  • team work
  • problem solving
  • public speaking
  • memory
  • time management
  • communication

Further Study

  • GCSE Drama
  • A level Drama/Theatre Studies
  • BTEC Performing Arts Level 3
  • Degrees in Performing Arts, Theatre Design, Media, Drama Therapy

Careers

  • Drama teacher
  • Director
  •  Professional Actor
  •  Designer (costume, lighting, sound, set etc.)
  •  Theatre Manager
  •  Producer
  •  Theatre Technician
  •  Drama Therapist

How can parents support their child's learning

  • ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  • get your child to teach you something they learnt today, see if they can help you remember it, as this will help ensure they understand it and consolidate their own learning.
  • get your child to regularly create revision posters / flash cards to help recap information
  • use your child’s workbooks / revision posters / flash cards to ask them questions and test their knowledge / help them to revise it regularly e.g. on a car journey, whilst making/eating dinner.
  • encourage your child to take part in Drama clubs in and out of school and support them with it
  • watch live or recorded theatre with your child, and ask them questions that would relate to GCSE Drama theory, such as; What vocal or physical skills is that actor using? How does the lighting reflect the mood/atmosphere? What are the actors doing well? How does the set help reflect the era of the play? Are the costumes correct for the time and setting of the play?

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

Head of Drama, Townsend Church of England School

English

Course Description

  • The subject enables students to develop their skills in reading and writing, as well as giving them the opportunity to appreciate a wide range of texts and genres. Through the course students develop the skills to become analytical as well as independent thinkers who can question and see the world from different perspectives.
  • Students receive three lessons of English every week in which they study both English language with Literature incorporated. Students are encouraged to read a text of their choice for five minutes, at the beginning of every lesson. This has become embedded in the whole school ethos as a school community, we recognise the importance of literacy.

Programme of Study

  • To develop literacy and prepare students for the challenge of the GCSE English Language examination, one lesson a week is taught using Accelerated Reader in the Library. This enables the teacher to guide the students towards becoming a more perceptive and independent learner.
  • Students also study a range of short texts such as: fiction, non-fiction, contemporary and classic texts. Using these mediums students are introduced to challenging vocabulary, textual, contextual issues and new ideologies found in both Pre 1900s and Pre 20th Century text.

English Language

  • Creative Writing based on Harris Burdick images
  • Writing to argue and persuade – based on Sea World
  • Ballads – Pre 19th/ 20th Century poems
  • ‘The Hunger Games’ – Exploring language and meaning
  • Creative Writing based on moving image from the film ‘Up’
  • Book reviews

English Literature

  • ‘A Christmas Carol’ – Abridged Version
  • ‘The Boy in Striped Pyjamas’
  • ‘Of Mice and Men’
  • Sherlock Holmes – ‘The Red Headed League’
  • Poetry
  • ‘Blood Brothers’
  • ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’
  • ‘The Hunger Games’

Assessment

Students are given an assessment at the end of every term or at the end of a scheme of work, as well as regular tests in keywords and challenging words.

  • Exploring/Analysing how writers use language to create characterisation, setting or atmosphere
  • Creative Writing based on a stimulus.
  • Diary entry exploring a characters’ feelings, thoughts and ideas
  • Exploring various ways that a poet conveys or presents a theme/atmosphere.
  • Persuasive speech
  • Newspaper article

Home Learning

Homework is given once a week. The tasks set is uploaded to a platform (SMHW) for all students and those who are unable to access it are given a paper copy of the task. Tasks set include:

  • Learning and practising spelling of keywords/challenging words
  • researching contextual issues and background of a text or event
  • Letter writing
  • Practising of Speaking and Listening
  • Creating newspaper articles
  • A diary entry
  • Practising close language analysis from a short extract
  • Reading
  • A book review
  • Spellings
  • Creative writing based on an image

Where can English take you

Further Study

  • GCSE English Literature
  • GCSE English Language

Careers

  • Journalism
  • Teacher
  • Writer
  • Critic
  • Editor
  • University Lecturer
  • Researcher
  • Law
  • Public Relations Officer
  • Newscaster
  • Broadcaster
  • Web content Manager
  • Newspaper/Magazine Editor
  • Librarian

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Demonstrate a positive attitude to education and success – discuss with your child what they have done in school, praise them for their success and find ways to help with their failures through speaking to your child’s teacher, using websites given, helping your child to make sense of the school notes and materials
  • Encourage your child to read – read yourself or with your child. Read fiction, non-fiction text. Read and discuss newspaper headlines, articles and even events reported on T.V can be an excellent way for children to become engaged with education and learning
  • Develop a partnership with your child’s teachers and school – this allows you to know about how to help with homework, progress of your child, ways to help your child and the school’s ethos (become an advocate for your child)
  • Know when assessments are about to occur and help your child revise through creating quizzes, flashcards, mind maps, revision questions. Help your child to test themselves on what they have learned by teaching you
  • Monitor your child’s television, video game and internet use
  • Encourage your child to participate in school extra curricula and other curricula activities to help develop their confidence.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs P.Harris, Head of English, Townsend Church of England School

Geography

Course Description

The Geography Department have a vision to provide a full and contemporary geography curriculum to our students. We want our students to be able to understand the human and physical world and the interactions between these systems.

This in short is to enable our students to “Think like Geographers”, by being able to analyse information to interpret the world around them, to care for the world around them and to understand how actions have consequences. We want students to understand their place in the UK and the world and their role within it, to be conscious of sustainability, equality and diversity and how to be responsible citizens.

Our students will learn about human and physical processes, geographical skills and places, contemporary issues, have a sense of time and spatial scales and be able to understand the complexity of life on Earth.


Programme of Study

Year 7

  • Mapskills
  • Africa
  • Earth Science (geology, weathering, soils and ecosystems)
  • Population and Urbanisation
  • Coasts
  • Economic Development

Year 8

  • Tectonics
  • Asia and the Middle East
  • Cold environments and Glaciation
  • Natural Resources
  • Rivers
  • Weather and Climate

Assessment

Students are assessed at the end of each unit each half term. Assessments take a variety of forms so that all learners have the opportunity to practice different assessment techniques. For example, assessments may be tests, extended writing tasks, presentations or projects.


Home Learning

In year 7 and 8 students complete one extended home learning project at home each year. This project will be over the course of a half term. Students will be provided with clear instructions and success criteria and work will be checked during the course of the half term by their class teacher. Year 7 complete a project on Russia and Year 8 complete a project on Japan.


Where can Geography take you

  • Geography is a popular and useful subject because it spans the sciences, the arts and the humanities in terms of skills, knowledge and understanding. It is therefore thought of highly by employers, colleges and universities.
  • It helps to develop your written and verbal communication skills and heightens your graphical, statistical and analytical skills.
  • It also teaches specialist skills that are applicable to everyday life like map reading, interpreting images/graphs/maps and so on.
  • In geography you will work alone, in pairs and groups and with people outside of your friendship circle, you will therefore be highly employable with many skills, substantial knowledge of the world we live in and you are likely to be comfortable working with others and talking to people. This is why Geography is so valued by employers and higher education.

Further Study

  • GCSE Geography

Careers

There are many jobs related specifically to geography such as:

  • volcanologist
  • teacher
  • cartographer
  • GIS programmer

Due to the skills set acquired there are many wide ranging jobs that studying geography can lead to, such as:

  • catastrophe modeller/hazard management
  • landscape architect
  • journalist
  • environmental lawyer
  • weather forecaster/meteorologist
  • town planner/designer
  • wildlife management
  • photographer
  • business management
  • retail

How can parents support their child's learning

Encourage your child to get outdoors and explore the natural world and to be aware of processes in the human world, like economics, politics and development. Encourage your child to question the world they live in and try to find out answers. In short – be interested in the world, not just their immediate surroundings. Read or watch the news, take an interest in wildlife and habitats and issues that affect people like climate change, energy consumption and how our country and other countries are governed. Watch documentaries, wildlife and travel programmes and films located in different places. Read about far flung places and explorers and adventures, get an atlas and study where places are in comparison to others.

  • BBC iPlayer – documentaries about the natural world (Blue Planet, Planet Earth, Planets, Earth: Power of the Planet)
  • You Tube – videos about hundreds of topics
  • Ted Talks
  • Films (e.g. An Inconvenient Truth & the sequel, Koyaanisqatsi, Erin Brockovitch, Plastic China, Made in Cambodia, One Day on Earth)
  • Travel Documentaries – find out about faraway places and life in other areas of the world

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs M. Buckland, Head of Geography, Townsend Church of England School

History

Course Description

KS3 in the History department at Townsend takes place over the period of Y7 and Y8, with a bridging year in Y9 where KS4 teaching begins. Students have 4 lessons a fortnight in History during Y7 and Y8.

This is a carefully constructed course in line with National Curriculum expectations that enables students to have a baseline of historical skills and knowledge that build upon KS2 learning and helps to form a bridge to future learning in History.

In year 7, students are introduced to key historical skills such as chronology, use of evidence and historical interpretation, that will give them the foundations of key techniques and ideas in History which are also continued through Y8. These ideas are there to be developed upon in KS4. These skills and key ideas are carefully planned into units which are regularly updated and adapted to the needs of the students.


Programme of Study

Year 7

  • What is History
  • Impact of the Norman Conquest
  • Church and monarchy in the Middle Ages
  • Life in the Middle Ages
  • Islam and the Crusades
  • Religion under the Tudors

Year 8

  • British Empire
  • The Slave trade
  • Industrial revolution
  • Rise f the Nazis
  • Holocaust
  • Second World War: At home and abroad

Assessment

Students will be set a baseline test at the start of the year to assess their knowledge and historical skills. There are regular retrieval knowledge tests to consolidate long term information. Students will sit a practice assessment in preparation for a formal assessment each half term. All assessments are designed to develop the skills required at GCSE level.


Home Learning

Home Learning take the form of a half termly project which seeks to support the development of knowledge and skills beyond the classroom.  Home Learning varies from reading to topic tests and revision for assessments.


Where can History take you

The skills acquired through the study of History, at any level, are invaluable for an array of career paths. Those listed below show just a few which have a direct and indirect relation to the subject.

Further Study

  • GCSE History

Careers

Careers related directly to History:

  • Heritage manager
  • Historic buildings inspector or conservation officer
  • Museum education officer
  • Museum or gallery curator
  • Museum or gallery exhibitions officer
  • Teaching

Careers where the qualification would be useful:

  • Editorial assistant
  • Information officer
  • Politician’s assistant
  • Law
  • Management consultancies
  • Publishing companies
  • Television and radio broadcasters.

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can discuss with the students how they plan to manage their time for the home learning tasks.
  • We strongly encourage students to gain background research from books rather than the internet as it is often age-inappropriate for students and the school’s Discovery Centre, local libraries and books at home would all be helpful to students deepening their knowledge and understand of the topics studied.
  • Visiting historical sites and encouraging discussion about the topics studied in class is also useful.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs J. Bailey, Head of History, Townsend Church of England School

Mathematics

Course Details

The Mathematics Department have decided to adopt a five-year scheme of learning, developed by White Rose Maths, that premised on the concept of mathematics mastery and covers both Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4.


Course Description  

The aim of this course and the Mathematics Department is to develop a culture of deep understanding, confidence and competence in maths – a culture that produces strong, secure learning and real progress. No matter what their starting points, we strive to facilitate learners to achieve excellence. We believe everynoe can do Maths. As we prove this to pupils, we’re hoping to shape assured, happy and resilient mathematicians who relish the challenge of maths and to become independent, reflective thinkers, whose skills not only liberate them in maths but also support them across the curriculum. We’re committed to working together to be and give the very best, and to make a difference to every pupil.


Programme of Study

Year 7

Term 1

  • Algebraic Thinking
  • Place Value and Proportion
  • Sequences
  • Understand and Use Algebraic Notation
  • Equality and Equivalence
  • Place Value and Ordering Integers and Decimals
  • Fraction, Decimal and Percentage Equivalence

Term 2

  • Applications of Number
  • Directed Number
  • Fractional Thinking
  • Solving Problems With Addition and Subtraction
  • Solving Problems With Multiplication and Division
  • Fractions and Percentages of Amounts
  • Operations and Equations With Directed Number
  • Addition and Subtraction of Fractions

Term 3

  • Lines and Angles
  • Reasoning With Number
  • Constructing, Measuring and Using Geometric Notation
  • Developing Geometric Reasoning
  • Developing Number Sense
  • Sets and Probability
  • Prime Numbers and Proof

Year 8

Term 1

  • Proportional Reasoning
  • Representations
  • Ratio and Scale
  • Multiplicative Change
  • Multiplying and Dividing Fractions
  • Working in the Cartesian Plane
  • Representing Data
  • Tables and Probability

Term 2

  • Algebraic Techniques
  • Developing Number
  • Brackets, Equations and Inequalities
  • Sequences
  • Indices
  • Fractions and Percentages
  • Standard Index Form
  • Number Sense

Term 3

  • Developing Geometry
  • Reasoning With Data
  • Angles in Parallel Lines and Polygons
  • Area of Trapezia and Circles
  • Line Symmetry and Reflection
  • The Data Handling Cycle
  • Measures of Location

Assessment

Assessment is conducted using End of Block tests, End of Term tests and End of Year tests. Students are also assessed every term using the Star Maths computer program.


Home Learning

The Mathematics Department subscribes to two main websites for home learning (alongside the White Rose Maths home learning resources) these are MyMaths and Mathswatch, tasks will be set on these platforms in addition to other tasks set by class teachers.


Where can Mathematics take you

Maths is one of the most respected subjects to achieve a qualification in, and the breadth of applications is immense. Mathematics underpins most of science, technology and engineering and is also important in areas as diverse as business, law, nutrition, sports science and psychology. There are many opportunities to use Maths to make a difference in society, for example through the analysis involved in medical research, developing new technology, modelling epidemics or in the study of patterns of criminal activity to identify trends. Studying Mathematics develops problem solving and logic skills, but also provides opportunities to develop team-working skills, resilience, effective communication and the ability to use your own initiative.

Further Study

  • GCSE Mathematics

Careers

  • Finance- Actuarial Work, Accountancy, Financial Modelling, Investment Banking
  • Computing- Games Design, Internet Security,  Telecommunications
  • Mathematical Biology- Population Modelling, Epidemics and Vaccination
  • Engineering- Aircraft Modelling, Fluid Flows, Acoustic Engineering, Quantity Surveyor, Planner
  • Teaching and Lecturing
  • Statistics- Medical Statistics, Market Research, Government Statistics
  • Business- Logistics, Traffic Planning, Project Management, Business Consultancy

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ensure that your child uses the internet learning tutorials effectively, possibly sitting with them and learning the Mathematics skills together.
  • Always try to take opportunities to use Mathematics and problem solving in real life contexts with your child: best buys at the supermarket; exchange rates for currency; conversion of measurements; utility bills; interest repayments on loans, mortgages or interest on investments; percentage increase/decrease; card/dice/board games; code-breaking and so on.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Head of Mathematics, Townsend Church of England School

Modern Foreign Languages

Course Details

Pearson Publications Dynamo 1 and 2


Course Description

Dynamo is a new course for KS3 French produced by Pearson publications with up-to-date cultural content and an active approach to learning grammar.

The course aims to:

  • Build key language skills at KS3 providing a seamless transition to the Studio course for the Pearson Edexcel GCSE (9–1) French qualification, ensuring pupils are ready for the demands of the new GCSE.
  • Offer a robust and pupil-friendly approach to the challenges of learning grammar, promoting active engagement and building on logical progression.
  • Give pupils a real taste of French culture, with up-to-date resources that bring language learning to life.
  • Meet learners’ individual learning needs with differentiation, included in both the print and interactive digital resources.
  • Allow effective assessment and help pupils familiarise themselves with GCSE-style tasks.

Programme of Study

Year 7

Content for the course is organised into five themes presented in five modules, each broken down into sub-topics, covered throughout the school year. Students follow the programme of study which is designed around these themes, developing their grammatical and vocabulary knowledge in addition to speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

1) La rentrée (Going back to school)

  • Introducing and talking about yourself.
  • Revision of KS2 key learning (numbers, days and months, alphabet, etc.)
  • Key French sounds which are revisited throughout the year.

2) En classe (School Life)

  • Developing pupils’ ability to give information about themselves and use key verbs correctly.
  • Expressing and justifying opinions using a range of opinion verbs.
  • Learning more about French culture including school life in France and Christmas in Francophone countries.

3) Mon temps libre (My Free Time)

  • Developing pupils’ use of verbs, opinions and adjectives to talk about their interests
  • Learning more key French sounds.
  • Learning more about French culture including different sports played in Francophone countries.

4) Ma vie de famille (Family Life)

  • Developing pupils’ ability to give information about family life
  • Expanding pupils’ knowledge of French grammar to be able to use verbs into the 3rd person singular and plural and 1st person plural forms to talk about others.
  • Learning more about French culture including home-life in Francophone countries as well as about Bastille Day celebrations.

5) En ville (In Town)

  • Learning key transactional language (e.g. for use in a café)
  • Learning how to talk about future events using the near future tense.
  • Learning more about French culture including popular French snacks and drinks and the capital of France via a virtual visit to Paris.

Year 8

There are two Dynamo courses for Year 8 – a foundation (vert) and higher (rouge) course, but both courses cover mostly the same content and are organised into five themes presented in five modules, each broken down into sub-topics, covered throughout the school year. Students follow the programme of study which is designed around these themes, developing their grammatical and vocabulary knowledge in addition to speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.  Teaching in Year 8 incorporates resources from both courses to meet the needs of all students.

1) Vive les vacances! (Holidays)

  • Developing pupils’ ability to talk about holidays.
  • Enabling students to talk about the past by Introducing the perfect tense.
  • Enabling students to express themselves in multiple timeframes by using the perfect and present tenses together.

2) J’adore les fêtes! (Celebrations and Festivals)

  • Developing pupils’ ability to talk about their likes/dislikes
  • Expanding their transactional language in context of buying food at a market.
  • Learning more about French culture including festivals and celebrations in the Francophone world and traditional French cuisine.

3) À loisir (Free Time)

  • Developing pupils’ ability to express opinions about TV and digital technology
  • Developing further their transactional language in the context of arranging to go out.
  • Expanding pupils’ grammar knowledge to communicate in three timeframes.
  • Learning more about French culture including leisure activities in different Francophone countries.

4) Le monde est petit (Where I live)

  • Developing pupils’ ability to talk about where they live and give opinions
  • Expanding pupils’ grammar knowledge to be able to use modal verbs and reflexive verbs to talk about daily routine.
  • Learning more about geographical aspects of France and Francophone countries as well as about famous French painters and their works of art.

5) Le sport en direct (Sport and Health)

  • Developing pupils’ ability to express their preferences by using comparatives.
  • Gaining further practice with transactional language in the context of talking to the doctor.
  • Learning how to form the imperative to be able to give and understand directions in French.
  • Learning more about French culture including learning about some famous sportspeople in the Francophone world.

Assessment

In addition to in class self, peer and teacher assessment, the following assessments take place:

  • 1 skill (listening, speaking, reading or writing) is assessed formally at the end of each half term.
  • At least 2 pieces of work are formally assessed by the teacher each half term.

Assessment is based on Dynamo 1 and 2 assessment materials which are designed to help students develop the skills required for the current specification GCSE exam.


Home Learning

Students will be given a homework task each week which should take approximately 30 minutes to complete. These will be set in class and published on Show My Homework and include activities such as:

  • Grammar practice exercise to reinforce learning in class
  • Reading comprehension tasks
  • Research of an aspect of French culture
  • Writing assignments on one of the key themes
  • Vocabulary revision

Where can French take you

Learning a language will be an advantage in almost any career which relies on excellent communication and interpersonal skills and top companies list French as one of the languages they would most like their employees to know.

Further Study

Taking GCSE French means you will:

  • Add an extra dimension to your personal skills profile which will impress anyone who reads your CV Be in a stronger position to get a job in companies with international links or improve employability if you would like to work abroad
  • Be able to work or study in a French-speaking country in later life
  • Be able to study A level French courses to further your knowledge of the language and culture
  • Find it easier to learn other languages later if you want to.

Careers

  • teacher, private tutor or online tutor
  • interpreter
  • translator
  • blogger, speaker and seller
  • YouTuber or podcaster
  • tour guide
  • liaison officer
  • charities administrator
  • human resources officer
  • journalist
  • logistics/distribution manager

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ask your child to about what they have learnt in their French lesson.
  • Get your child to teach you something they learnt today, as this will help ensure they understand it and consolidate their own learning
  • Help your child to revise by testing them using their exercise books /revision materials, so they can identify gaps in their knowledge.
  • Encourage your child to take an interest in the francophone (French speaking) world including current affairs and culture.

Useful Links

This is the online version of the Pearson Dynamo textbooks we use in class in Years 7 and 8. Students have individual login and password details and exercises are set to allow students to access at home and revise. The advantage of using this package to revise is that it covers exactly the same topics, vocabulary and structures which study in class. There are grammar, reading and listening activities.

This package is available to Year 8 in KS3 and in one of their French lessons each week, they follow a separate IT scheme of work using this package which compliments and supports their work in their other French lessons . It provides grammar and comprehension exercises using recordings of native French speakers. Students have individual login and password details and exercises can be set to allow students to access at home and revise. Students revise by completing exercises and play interactive games.

Students in KS3 can access this package at home and reinforce learning of core vocabulary by revising and testing their knowledge through online language games and activities.


For More Information, Contact:

Head of MFL, Townsend Church of England School

Music

Course Details

The Music course follows the National Curriculum, covering a series of topics across key stage 3.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239088/SECONDARY_national_curriculum_-_Music.pdf


Course Description

At Townsend we believe Music is something that should be accessible for all, and accordingly the Key Stage 3 curriculum provides students with the skills necessary for participation in music throughout their lives, as well as preparing students for further study in Music and Music Technology. Learning is largely practical, with students experiencing a range of instruments and computer software and, where possible, there is an emphasis on group work and independent working. The course comprises a series of Units that are linked to the revised National Curriculum Programme of Study in Music. Each has a practical outcome, encouraging students to develop their performing and composing skills through a study of specific musical techniques, genres or traditions


Programme of Study

Year 7

Students will acquire the skills of performance, composition and analysis required for a study of music, through singing and playing a range of instruments including drums, percussion, guitar and keyboards. They will explore of a variety of music from different traditions, including Western classical and popular music, and music from Africa and the Caribbean.

Keyboard Skills

  • Students learn vocal warm-up techniques, how to play and compose melodies using keyboard, incorporate singing with playing the keyboard,  explore how music can be written down and how to keep in time with drum beats and other students.

Keyboard and Vocal Skills

  • Students will build on their skills, with an emphasis on using them in combination with other students in small groups, and individually in preparation for performance.

Instruments of the Orchestra

  • Students will learn about the families of instruments in the orchestra using Benjamin Britten’s Young Persons Guide to the Orchestra, followed by further examination of certain instruments of students’ choice.
  • Students will continue developing keyboard skills while learning musical passages typical of orchestral instruments.

Ukelele Skills

  • Students will learn to play basic chords and melodies on the ukulele, focusing on singing and playing songs that are typical of the repertoire in large and small groups.

Riffs, Loops and Sequencing

  • Students will learn how riffs, loops and beats are used in popular music and create pieces of music using Garage Band software to combine several different parts in a collage structure

Elements of Song

  • Students will learn more about chords and scales and song structure, combining all the skills they have learned during the year to perform songs in large and small ensembles
  • Students will be expected to research songs on their own, and share that research with the class.

Year 8

Students will learn about the roles taken by different performers in a variety of ensembles, continue to develop their practical skills through study of genres including Blues, Jazz and Latin American music, and start to apply these skills independently in order to work towards specific briefs, such as composing for film, computer games or adverts. Students will also use the principles of the national Musical Futures Project to perform, remix and compose music of their own choosing.

Blues and Jazz

  • Students will build on work using chords and improvisations to perform and compose pieces inspired by early 20th Century American popular music genres such as Blues and Jazz

Blues, Jazz and Percussion

  • Students will learn about percussion instruments and notation, and create compositions utilising a variety of instruments

Film Music

  • Students will use elements of music to compose music that depicts moods, places and characters, combining these skills to create a composition suitable for use in film, TV or computer games

Popular Music

  • Students will work in groups to learn the song of their own choice, whilst exploring popular music conventions

African Drumming

  • Students will learn the basic elements of African Drumming, including notation, and will compose a percussion piece in a small ensemble

Song Writing

  • Students will work independently to compose and perform a song, drawing on all the varied skills they have learnt

Assessment

Students will be assessed on 2 criteria:

  • Practical 70% - Skills in playing various instruments and music technology.
  • Written 30% - Including worksheets in class, and homework.

Home Learning

Students will be given homework to support classroom activities, which will be set on Show My Homework. Students who have access to any music instruments or computer music software should practice the pieces they are working on in class, at home.

Those students who are interested in following a music course of study or profession should make daily practice part of their routine.


Where can Music take you

KS3 Music presents students with the fundamentals of playing several musical instruments and introduces some of the discipline that is required for further study and/or a career in a music related field. This is a real opportunity to explore music and find whether music might be a possible field of interest for the student.

Further Study

 Careers

  • performer
  • teacher
  • composer
  • music technology
  • recording
  • music therapy
  • music production

How can parents support their child's learning

  • ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  • ask your child to play or sing a song from class
  • for children that are practising an instrument, take an interest and help the student to have a space with some privacy and without too much interruption for a specified period of time.

Useful Links


For More Information, Contact:

Head of Music, Townsend Church of England School

Physical Education

Course Details

The aims of the Physical Education National Curriculum are to ensure that all pupils develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities, that they are physical active for sustained periods of time, they engage in competitive sports and activities and that they lead healthy, active lives.


Course Description

  • Students will participate in 2 x 1 hour core PE lessons every week from year 7-11.
  • PE lessons aim to develop their love of sport and physical activity, develop the fitness and skills, and an understanding of the rules and regulations of sports, as well as communication, teamwork, leadership and sportsmanship to enable them to keep fit in order to lead a healthy active life and play sports to a higher level.
  • The Physical education curriculum allows students to experience practical participation in the following areas:
    • Athletics
    • Dance
    • Fitness
    • Games – such as netball, football, rugby, basketball, tennis, table tennis, cricket and rounders.
    • Gymnastics and trampolining
    • Swimming
  • Students will develop their skills and techniques in each activity and start to apply them in competitive games and events. They will also be provided with opportunities to participate in inter-form competitions where they will develop personal qualities such as teamwork, communication and commitment. They will also begin to understand what makes a performance effective and learn about the fitness requirements of different activities. Students will also develop the ability to prepare themselves for, and recover effectively from, physical activity through warming up and cooling down. Throughout each year, students will be introduced to some of the theoretical knowledge required for GCSE PE to help them understand the importance of physical activity to their health and well-being.
  • Students are also provided with opportunities to progress their skills further through a wide range of extra-curricular sports clubs available at break, lunch time and after school, where they may be selected to represent the school in fixtures and competitions.

Programme of Study

Year 7 

  • Throughout year 7 the focus of PE lessons will be creating a love for physical education.
  • Through games activities such as netball, basketball, rugby, football, rounders, cricket, tennis and table tennis, students will develop the core skills, basic fitness and understanding of the main rules needed to compete in a game.
  • In gymnastics, they will develop the basic components of a routine, focusing on using the core skills.
  • In swimming, students will develop the correct, and more efficient techniques for body position, arms, legs and breathing for the main strokes.
  • In dance, students will develop set motifs, understanding how to incorporate variations in space, levels, unison, canon and timing.
  • Through their fitness lessons, students will develop an understanding of the components of fitness and how to train to improve their fitness, so they can improve their performance in a variety of sports.
  • In athletics, they will cover the three disciplines of running, jumping and throwing, developing basic techniques and an understanding of the rules of each event.

Year 8

  • Throughout year 8 the focus of PE lessons will be broadening sporting experiences.
  • Through games activities students will develop their performance of core and advanced skills, improving their understanding of how to apply them tactically to outwit opponents.
  • In gymnastics they will develop routines to include travel, shaped and twisting jumps and rotations onto and over equipment.
  • In swimming students will improve the efficiency of technique for body position, arms, legs and breathing in preparation for competitions in the main strokes.
  • In dance students will develop an understanding of how to choreograph a dance around a stimulus, focusing on body posture/alignment, tension and use of space, levels and flight.
  • Through their fitness lessons, students will develop an understanding of how to improve their fitness using a variety of methods, incorporating the FITT principles of training.
  • In athletics students will focus on developing their speed/power and distance of their runs/jumps/throws, understanding how to adapt their approach, execution and follow through to improve their performance.

Assessment

Students will be awarded a level they are working at on each sport/activity they take part in during their PE lessons throughout each year. An average of their levels across the sports will be reported home 3 times a year.

Assessments are based on the 4 levels, and whether they are beginning to perform those skills, performing them sometimes, frequently or consistently.

  • Acquiring – students can perform some core skills in isolation with some consistency
  • Developing – students can perform most core skills in isolation with good consistency
  • Applying – students can perform all core skills and some advanced skills in a variety of situations (against a partner, under pressure, in a sequence) with very good consistency
  • Mastering – students can perform all skills in competitive situations (in a game/match/routine) with excellent consistency

Home Learning

  • Students are encouraged to take part in sports clubs both in and out of school to develop their sporting performances further, and practice applying their skills in more competitive situations.
  • A list of sports clubs that students can take part in at school during break times, lunch times and after school is updated regularly.
  • If you would like to support your child further by joining sports clubs outside of school, please do not hesitate to contact the PE department for suggestions of suitable local clubs.

Where can Physical Education take you

Further Study

  • GCSE PE
  • BTEC Sport

Careers

  • Professional athlete
  • PE teacher
  • Physiotherapist
  • Professional Sports person
  • Sports Coach
  • Sports policy developer
  • Fitness instructor / Personal trainer
  • Nutritionist

How parents can support their child's learning

  • Encourage your child to exercise regularly – at least 30 minutes per day
  • Support your child’s interest in a sport or physical activity by encouraging them to take it up as a club in or out of school.
  • Watch sporting events with your child to support them with their interests

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss C.Pennifold, Head of Physical Education, Townsend Church of England School

Religious Studies

Course Details

The aim of Religious Studies at Townsend is to provide a balanced curriculum which enables students to be able to be religiously and theologically literate and can articulate their views on a range of religious and non-religious worldviews. In line with the Townsend’s Respect For All Vision, our aim in RS is to empower students to use their voice to respect the beliefs of others, show compassion and empathy to all faiths as well as those without.


Course Description

In line with the Church of England Schools Statement of Entitlement and Hertfordshire Agreed Syllabus at least 50% of the course for KS3 allows students to acquire a rich, deep knowledge of Christian beliefs and practices which includes the ways in which it is unique and diverse. The other topics includes the other Abrahamic faiths, Eastern religions and non-religious worldviews.


Programme of Study

Year 7

Autumn Term

  • Students begin by looking at the importance of the Bible with special focus on the Old Testament Stories that are important in the Abrahamic faiths before learning about key beliefs and practices within Judaism.

Spring Term

  • Students explore the Person of Jesus from a historical context to the impact on believers today and how the church developed after his death, with a focus on some key individuals such as Alban.

Summer Term

  • Students explore key beliefs and practices of two Eastern religions beginning with Sikhism and then Hinduism and the challenges that might be faced by believers in Britain.

Year 8

Autumn Term

  • Students begin by learning about the Judeo-Christian concept of God as well as a range of arguments for and against the existence of God. They explore the idea about Creation and unpick whose responsibility it is to look after our planet.

Spring Term

  • Students examine the idea of Suffering how humanity has dealt its presence and whether anything can be learnt from it. The second part of this term involves a detailed look at Islam; the beginning, some beliefs and the experience of being Muslim in Great Britain today.

Summer Term

  • Students learn about non-religious worldviews and explore the idea that a meaningful life can be fully lived without religion. Finally, students examine Buddhism, the origins and how and why Buddhist beliefs are reflected in meditation.

Assessment

The assessment for KS3 involves a combination of quizzes and questions which require extended written responses. These can be self, peer or teacher assessed.


Home Learning

In one half term students will undertake a project to compliment and reinforce leaning from one topic:

  • Year 7  - The Person of Jesus
  • Year 8  - Non-Religious Worldviews

Where can Religious Studies take you

Knowledge of other cultures and world religious beliefs can be useful in many jobs where you are working with the public or communities. These include counselling and social services, marketing, sales and advertising, catering and hospitality, leisure, sport and tourism, retail sales and customer services, education and training, medicine and nursing, and service sector roles.

My Future My Career My RE http://casestudies.reonline.org.uk

Further Study

  • GCSE Religious Studies

Careers

  • Law
  • Doctor
  • Firefighter
  • Philosophy
  • Politics
  • Economics
  • Reporter

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ask students about what they are currently learning about.
  • Get your child to teach you something they have been taught.
  • Quiz your child on their learning.
  • Be aware of what is going on it the news and discuss where appropriate with them e.g. the Environment

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Ms A.Sheppard, Head of Religious Studies and Worship, Townsend Church of England School

Science

Course Description

  • KS3 in the science department at Townsend takes place over the period of Y7 and Y8, with a bridging year in Y9 where KS4 teaching begins.
  • Students have 6 lessons a fortnight in science during Y7 and Y8.

This is a carefully constructed course in line with National Curriculum expectations that enables students to have a baseline of scientific skills and knowledge that build upon KS2 learning and helps to form a bridge to future learning in science.

  • In year 7 students are introduced to key scientific skills that will give them the foundations of key techniques and ideas in science which are also continued through
  • Y8. These ideas are there to be developed upon in KS4. These skills and key ideas are carefully planned into units which are regularly updated and adapted to the needs of the students.

Programme of Study

Over the period of KS3 students are introduced to a wide variety of interesting topics which include some exciting practical opportunities. The following content is covered in KS3:

  • Working Scientifically
  • Particle Model and Pressure
  • Reproduction in Plants and Animals
  • Cells
  • Energy
  • Light and Sound
  • Universe
  • Electricity and Magnetism
  • Separating Mixtures
  • Periodic Table, Atoms, Elements and Compounds
  • Variation, Inheritance and Evolution
  • Photosynthesis and Respiration
  • Interdependence
  • Forces and Gravity
  • Earth’s Structure and Materials
  • Heating and Cooling
  • Acids and Alkalis
  • Organ Systems, Digestion and Breathing
  • Climate and Earth’s Resources

Assessment

The content of the course is divided into units containing an equal share of all three sciences (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) and assessed across the year in four end of unit assessments that have been carefully developed to assess skills as well as knowledge and is able to monitor the progress for all abilities.


Home Learning

Students complete a home learning project each term to accentuate their learning but also build on wider scientific knowledge and skills, and these often involve research. Individual teachers may also set smaller tasks that are more directly linked to class learning, such as completion of work, quizzes and revision.


Where can Science take you

Science can not only lead you down a broad range of careers and further study but it can lead you into lifelong passions and hobbies. Science is an absolute key player in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) subjects. Whilst people follow science careers because they feel like they have an affinity for science, or an ambition, or just pure interest in the sciences, it is common knowledge that the careers are some of the top paying and most respectable in the world, whether to be an Engineer, a Researcher, or a vital role in the NHS.

Further Study

  • GCSE Combined Science
  • GCSE Separate Sciences

Careers

  • Engineer
  • Researcher
  • Medicine
  • Marine Biology
  • Forensic Science
  • Conservation Biology and Ecology
  • Veterinarian Medicine
  • Mechanical Engineering

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can regularly check Show My Homework to check homework projects and any other notices, and should also be reading the Parentmail sent out each week for any key information.
  • Parents can also encourage their children to be completing extra revision at home and ensuring students are equipped with pens, pencils, rulers and calculators for every science lesson as a minimum.

Useful Links

BBC Bitesize is a great resource to help with science learning - https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zng4d2p

Join Seneca Learning for free to help with revision, missed lessons and extra help - https://app.senecalearning.com/classroom/course/419c7523-d408-4bc7-9b96-f7f12abdacae/section/36f04bf1-20a5-4cf5-b0c4-48fb0120e7fe/session


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss N. Guijarro, Head of Science, Townsend Church of England School