↑ Return to Curriculum

Key Stage 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art & Design

Course Details

GCSE Art and Design, AQA


Course Description

The AQA Art and Design course is designed to inspire, challenge and motivate every student, no matter what their level of ability at Townsend. This specification allows students to develop their knowledge and understanding during the course through a variety of learning experiences and approaches, including engagement with artists, craft persons and designers. Students will be able to develop their skills in using range of media, techniques and processes in order to explore, create and communicate their own ideas effectively in 2D and 3D forms. They will be able to demonstrate these skills through the development, refinement, recording, realisation and presentation of their ideas through a portfolio and by responding to an externally set assignment.


Programme of Study

Component 1: Portfolio (60%)

AQA states that-Each student must select and present a portfolio representative of their course of study. The portfolio must include both:

  1. A sustained project developed in response to a subject, theme, task or brief evidencing the journey from initial engagement with an idea(s) to the realisation of intentions. This will give students the opportunity to demonstrate, through an extended creative response, their ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skills and/or understanding from across their course of study.
  2. A selection of further work resulting from activities such as trials and experiments; skills based workshops; mini and/or foundation projects; responses to gallery, museum or site visits.

Year 9

At the start of Year 9 students take part in a variety of skills based workshops. They then go on to study the theme of Natural Forms and are introduced to a wide range of artists, craft persons and designers to draw inspiration from. Student also attend a gallery visit in order to gain first-hand experience of works of art close up. Students produce a portfolio on the theme linking to all four assessment objectives.

Year 10

At the start of Year 10 students take part in a variety of skills based workshops. They then go on to study the theme of Ancient Cultures and are introduced to a wide range of artists, craft persons and designers to draw inspiration from. Student visit the British Museum in order to gain first-hand experience of works of art up close. Students produce a portfolio on the theme linking to all four assessment objectives.

Year 11

At the start of Year 11 students are able to refine both their Year 9 and Year 10 projects, or go on to a third free choice title project following the same format as the other two. Students produce a portfolio on the theme linking to all four assessment objectives.

Component 2: Externally Set Assignment

AQA will provide a separate externally set assignment for each title, each with seven different starting points. Students must select and respond to one starting point from their chosen title. The externally set assignment provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate, through an extended creative response, their ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skills and/or understanding in response to their selected starting point. The extended creative response must explicitly evidence students’ ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skill and/or understanding from initial engagement with their selected starting point through to their realisation of intentions in the 10 hours of supervised time. Students must ensure that the total submission for Component 2 evidences coverage of all four assessment objectives and evidence of drawing activity and written annotations. Students must identify and acknowledge sources which are not their own.


Assessment

Students are marked on four Assessment Objectives throughout the course. Each Assessment Objective carries a maximum of 24 marks.

  • AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.
  • AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.
  • AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.
  • AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Component 1 - Portfolio

  • 96 marks
  • completed throughout the course
  • 60% of overall GCSE

Students work is assessment regularly through marking and moderation with other teachers to check accuracy of marking that is in line with AQA standards.

Component 2 - Externally Assessed Assignment

  • 96 marks
  • 10 hours supervised time
  • 40% of GCSE
    • Project work 30%
    • 10 hours supervised work 10%
  • Exam paper given out in January, assessment carried out in May under exam conditions.

Students work is assessed regularly through marking and moderation with other teachers to check accuracy of marking that is in line with AQA standards.


Home Learning

Students should be doing 2 hrs of extended learning per week outside of school or in art clubs. Home learning will be based on individual targets set in class, such as;

  • Research tasks on artists, craft persons and designers
  • Skills based activities such as drawing, panting, mixed media experimentation and model making

Where can Art and Design take you

Further Study

  • A Level Art
  • Photography
  • Fine Art
  • Art and Design
  • Textiles
  • Graphic communication
  • 3-Dimensional Design
  • Degrees in
    • Architectural Design and Visualisation
    • Interior Design
    • Product Design
    • Fashion
    • Prosthetics and Special Effects Design

Careers

  • Architect
  • Interior Designer
  • Set Designer
  • Animator
  • Web Designer
  • Graphic Designer
  • Graphic Illustrator
  • Fine Artists
  • Commercial Artist
  • Museum Curator
  • Digital 3D Modeller
  • Video Games Designer

More information on careers related to art: https://www.studentartguide.com/articles/art-careers-list


How can parents support their child's learning

  • By encouraging them to familiarise themselves with the specification and the marking matrix.
  • To support them in improving their knowledge and understanding of different artists, craft persons and designers. This can be done through in-depth research and visits to see works of art first hand in museums and galleries, locally and in the wider area if possible.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

Miss F.Bailey, Head of Art Townsend, Church of England School

Business Education

Course Details

NCFE Level 1/2 Technical Award in Business and Enterprise (603/2955/5)

https://www.qualhub.co.uk/qualification-search/qualification-detail/ncfe-level-12-technical-award-in-business-and-enterprise-4594


Course Description

The Business and Enterprise course allows students to develop their knowledge and understanding of how a business operates and considers the key functional areas of a business including Marketing, Finance, Operations and Human Resources. The external environment that businesses operate within is also investigated. The qualification will appeal to students who have a general interest in business and current affairs or who may wish to pursue a career in the business and enterprise sector in the future. The course is also strong preparation for further study in the subject, and includes a vocational and project-based element which will benefit practical learners.

Students have five one-hour Business and Enterprise lessons over a two week timetable. Lessons are classroom based and utilise a wide range of resources in addition to independent study and research. A range of methods will be used to develop the skills of analysis, decision making and evaluation. The emphasis is on learning through case study material that reflects issues faced by firms. Progress is assessed regularly throughout the course.


Programme of Study

The course is comprised of 2 units:

Unit 1 – Introduction to Business and Enterprise - Exam – 40%

The unit introduces the aims and objectives of a business and the characteristics and skills needed to become an entrepreneur. A range of legal structures are investigated including sole traders, partnerships and limited companies. Organisational structure is considered in greater detail and the importance of stakeholder engagement. The functional areas of marketing and operations are also covered in unit one. Students will also study the internal and external influences on business.

Unit 2 – Understanding Resources for Business and Enterprise Planning - Project – 60%

The second unit builds on this introduction to understand the requirements to set up and/or grow a business. This will involve an understanding of research and resource planning including human resource requirements and understand of enterprise funding and business finance. Students will develop the skills to produce a basic business plan.


Assessment

Unit 1 – Introduction to Business and Enterprise - Exam – 40%

  • 1 hour 30 minutes – a mixture of multiple choice and short answer and extended response questions based on a case study. The exam will include numerical questions as well as short and long written answers.
  • Expected exam date – November/March of Year 10
  • Students have one opportunity to resit the exam.

Unit 2 – Understanding Resources for Business and Enterprise Planning - Project – 60%

  • 21 supervised hours – A project brief is released by the exam board. The scenario is likely to be related to a start-up or growing business and involve the preparation of a business plan or other business advice.
  • Expected submission date – Spring term of Year 11
  • Students have one opportunity to resubmit coursework.

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework or Google Classroom and include activities such as:

  •  creating a poster on a successful entrepreneur
  •  completing a quiz to check understanding of a topic
  •  answer exam questions on a topic
  •  research a specific topic, such as the sources of finance available to a business
  •  create a presentation to deliver in class on a specific topic, such as a the product life cycle of a selected product

As well as completing the weekly homework tasks, students should be reading through their class notes after each lesson to check understanding and prepare questions to ask the teacher where additional help is needed. To help with revision for the exam it is recommended that students prepare revision resources for topics as they are learning them.


Where can Business take you

Further Study

  • A level Business, Economics or Accounting
  • BTEC Business Level 3
  • Apprenticeship in Business
  • Degrees in Business, Economics, Management, Administration, Finance, Accounting,   Marketing, Human Resources, Hospitality and Leisure and Tourism
  • Professional Business and Finance qualifications such as, AAT, CIMA, ACCA, ACA, MBA

   Careers

  • Entrepreneur
  • Accountant
  • Management Consultant
  • Actuary
  • Business Teacher
  • HR Manager
  • Marketing
  • Human Resource Manager
  • Banking
  • Stockbroker
  • Logistics and Supply Chains

How can parents support their child's learning

  • ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  • discuss current business and economic events to engage your child in wider learning and reading
  • review work set on SMHW and Google Classroom
  • use your child’s workbooks / revision posters / flash cards to ask them questions and test their knowledge, regular repetition will consolidate learning and practice key skills
  • encourage your child to attend consolidation and revision sessions

Useful Links

For More Information, Contact:

Miss A. Philpott, Townsend Church of England School

Computer Science (2016)

Course Details

Edexcel Computer Science 1CP1


Course Description

The GCSE computer Science course develops ‘underpinning knowledge’ and transferable skills for progression to A levels or BTEC Nationals and to higher education or the workplace. It includes topics that extend students’ understanding and aid progression, for example, the internet and databases.  The skills and knowledge developed through this qualification help students to:

  • understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms, and data representation
  • analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs
  • think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  • understand the components that make up digital systems and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society
  • apply mathematical skills relevant to computer science.

Programme of Study

The course consists of six key topic areas

1) Problem Solving

Students will develop a set of computational thinking skills that enable them to understand how computer systems work, and to design, implement and analyse algorithms for solving problems.  Students are given repeated opportunities to tackle computational problems of various sorts, including some substantial problem-solving tasks.

2) Programming

Programming is an essential part of the Computer Science course.  Students build on their KS3 programming skills using python as the main language.  Students are given repeated opportunities to develop and practise their programming skills.

3)Data

Students learn how different types of data are represented in a computer

4) Computers

Students are familiarised with the hardware and software components that make up a computer system and are taught to recognise that computers take many forms from embedded microprocessors to distributed clouds.

5) Communication and the Internet

Computer networks and the internet are now ubiquitous. Many computer applications in use today would not be possible without networks. Students are taught to understand the key principles behind the organisation and of computer networks.

6) The Bigger Picture

Students are made aware of the influence of computing technology and to recognise that computing has an impact on nearly every aspect of the world in which they live.


Assessment

Students complete two exams at the end of the course in year 11.

Component 1: Principles of Computer Science (1CP1/01)

50% of the qualification and is a written examination of 1 hour and 40 minutes

This component will assess the topics:

  • Understanding of what algorithms are, what they are used for and how they work; ability to interpret, amend and create algorithms.
  • Understand the requirements for writing program code.
  • Understanding of binary representation, data representation, data storage and compression, encryption and databases.
  • Understanding of components of computer systems; ability to construct truth tables, produce logic statements.
  • Understanding of computer networks, the internet and the worldwide web.
  • Awareness of emerging trends in computing technologies, and the impact of computing on individuals, society and the environment, including ethical, legal and ownership issues.

Component 2: Application of Computational Thinking (1CP1/02)

50% of the qualification and is a written examination of 2 hours

The main focus of this component is:

  • understanding what algorithms are, what they are used for and how they work; ability to interpret, amend and create algorithms
  • understanding how to develop program code and constructs, data types, structures, input/output, operators and subprograms.

This component may also draw on:

  • understanding binary representation, data representation, data storage and compression, encryption and databases
  • understanding components of computer systems; ability to construct truth tables,produce logic statements and read and interpret pseudocode
  • understanding computer networks, the internet and the worldwide web
  • awareness of emerging trends in computing technologies, the impact of computing on individuals, society and the environment, including ethical, legal and ownership issues.

Both exam papers are based on different scenarios and consist of short open-response, open-response and extended open-response answer questions.


Home Learning

Students will be set weekly homework tasks that could incorporate some revision tasks, some on-screen programming tasks or utilising online platforms such as Seneca learning.


Where can Computer Studies take you

Any role involving problem solving

  • Computer Programmer
  • Software Developer
  • Hardware Engineer
  • Systems Manager
  • Web Developer
  • Software Engineer
  • Database Administrator
  • IT Architect
  • Network Administrator
  • Systems Analyst
  • Security Analyst
  • Information Researcher

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Encourage students to explain what they have learnt.
  • Encourage students to create flashcards or just to review their work.
  • Access to python in order to program is essential and this does not need to be downloaded but can be used online.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs H.King, Head of Computer Science, Townsend Church of England School

Computer Science (2020)

Course Details

Edexcel Computer Science 1CP2


Course Description

The GCSE computer Science course develops ‘underpinning knowledge’ and transferable skills for progression to A levels or BTEC Nationals and to higher education or the workplace. It includes topics that extend students’ understanding and aid progression, for example, the internet and databases.  The skills and knowledge developed through this qualification help students to:

  • understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms, and data representation
  • analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs
  • think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  • understand the components that make up digital systems and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society
  • apply mathematical skills relevant to computer science.
  • privacy and cyber-security

Programme of Study

The course consists of six key topic areas

1) Computational Thinking

Students are taught to develop a set of computational thinking skills that enable them to design, implement and analyse algorithms for solving problems.

2) Data

Computers use binary to represent different types of data. Students are taught how different types of data are represented in a computer.

3) Computers

Students are familiarised with the hardware and software components that make up a computer system.

4) Networks

Students are taught the key principles behind the organisation of computer networks.

5) Issues and Impact

Students should be aware of the influence of digital technology and recognise some of the issues and the impact on wider society associated with its use.

6) Problem solving with programming

Students are presented with problems set in the practical programming tasks in the examination.  These problems can be solved with the functionalities presented in the Programming Language Subset (PLS) document that is provided as part of the on-screen exam.


Assessment

Comprising of two exams completed at the end of year 11, students are given one paper and one on-screen exam.

Paper 1: Principles of Computer Science (1CP2/01)

A written examination worth 50% of the qualification and completed at the end of the course over 1 hour and 30 minutes.  This paper will assess Topics 1 to 5.

  • Topic 1: Computational thinking - understanding of what algorithms are, what they are used for and how they work; ability to follow, amend and write algorithms; ability to construct truth tables.
  • Topic 2: Data - understanding of binary, data representation, data storage and compression.
  • Topic 3: Computers - understanding of hardware and software components of computer systems and characteristics of programming languages.
  • Topic 4: Networks - understanding of computer networks and network security.
  • Topic 5:Issues and impact - awareness of emerging trends in computing technologies, and the impact of computing on individuals, society and the environment, including ethical, legal and ownership issues.

This paper consists of five compulsory questions, each one focused on one of the topic areas. The questions consist of multiple-choice, short-, medium- and extended-open-response, tabular and diagrammatic items.

Application of Computational Thinking (1CP2/02)

An onscreen examination worth 50% of the qualification and completed at the end of the course over 2 hours.  This paper will assess Topic 6: Problem solving with programming.  The main focus of this paper is:

  • understanding what algorithms are, what they are used for and how they work in relation to creating programs
  • understanding how to decompose and analyse problem
  • ability to read, write, refine and evaluate programs.

This is an on-screen exam and consists of six compulsory questions.


Home Learning

Students will be set weekly homework tasks that could incorporate some revision tasks, some on-screen programming tasks or utilising online platforms such as Seneca learning.


Where can Computer Studies take you

Any role involving problem solving

  • Computer Programmer
  • Software Developer
  • Hardware Engineer
  • Systems Manager
  • Web Developer
  • Software Engineer
  • Database Administrator
  • IT Architect
  • Network Administrator
  • Systems Analyst
  • Security Analyst
  • Information Researcher

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Encourage students to explain what they have learnt.
  • Encourage students to create flashcards or just to review their work.
  • Access to python in order to program is essential and this does not need to be downloaded but can be used online.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs H.King, Head of Computer Science, Townsend Church of England School

Design Technology - Food Preparation and Nutrition

Course Details

AQA GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition (8585)


Course Description

This new GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition is an exciting and creative course which focuses on practical cooking skills to ensure students develop a thorough understanding of nutrition, food provenance and the working characteristics of food materials. At its heart, this qualification focuses on nurturing students' practical cookery skills to give them a strong understanding of nutrition.


Programme of Study

Food preparation skills are integrated into five core topics:

  • Food, nutrition and health
  • Food science
  • Food safety
  • Food choice
  • Food provenance

Assessment

There are two elements to the assessment of GCSE Design and Technology.

1) Paper 1: Food Preparation and Nutrition

  • 100 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE

The exam will consist of multiple choice questions (20 marks) and 5 questions with a number of sub questions (80 marks). It will assess theoretical knowledge of food preparation and nutrition across all 5 core topics.

2) Non-Exam Assessment (NEA)

  • 50 % of overall GCSE
  • Task 1 - Food Investigation
    • 30 marks
    • 15% of overall GCSE
    • 1,500 - 2000 words, including photographic evidence of practical investigation
  • Task 2 - Food Preparation Assessment
    • 70 marks
    • 35% of overall GCSE
    • Portfolio including photographic evidence of three final dishes

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework. Home learning tasks will involve purchase and preparation of ingredients needed for lessons.

As well as completing their weekly homework task students are encouraged to cook at home.


Where can GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition take you?

Career opportunities for those who have studied GCSE food preparation and nutrition are interesting and varied.

Further Study

  • A Level Food and Nutrition
  • Level 3 Diploma in Food Technology
  • Level 3 Diploma in Food Science and Nutrition

Careers

  • Chef
  • Food Technologist
  • Nutritionist
  • Catering
  • Food Production
  • Health and Fitness

How parents can support their child's learning

  • Discuss your child’s learning with them on a regular basis, ask them what learnt in their lesson, ask your child to teach you something that they learnt today as this will help to consolidate their learning.
  • Encourage your child cook at home, this will help develop their repertoire of skills they can use in the GCSE non examined assessment.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mr D.Hill, Head of Design and Technology, Townsend Church of England School

Design Technology - Product Design

Course Details

GCSE Design and Technology, AQA - 8552


Course Description

The GCSE Design and Technology course requires students to apply iterative design processes to develop solutions to real and relevant problems. Students will need to consider the needs of a variety of users, their wants and their values. Design and Technology gives students opportunities to apply knowledge from other disciplines, including mathematics, science, art and design, computing and the humanities.

  • We offer students the opportunity to specialise in one of two material areas within DT, either Timbers or Textiles.

Programme of Study

The course contains 3 sections:

1) Core Technical Principles

Students will develop a knowledge and understanding of the following:

  • new and emerging technologies
  • energy generation and storage
  • developments in new materials
  • systems approach to designing
  • mechanical devices
  • materials and their working properties

All students opting for GCSE DT will study the same core technical principles, regardless of whether they opted for timbers or textiles as their specialism.

2) Specialist Technical Principles

All students will learn about:

  • selection of materials or components
  • forces and stresses
  • ecological and social footprint
  • sources and origins
  • using and working with materials
  • stock forms, types and sizes
  • scales of production
  • specialist techniques and processes
  • surface treatments and finishes.

Each of these specialist principles must be taught through at least one material category. Students who opted to study DT Textiles will learn about these principles with a focus on textile based materials, while those who chose to study timbers will learn about these principles with a focus on timber based materials.

3) Design and Making Principles

Students will learn about:

  • investigation, primary and secondary data
  • environmental, social and economic challenge
  • the work of others
  • design strategies
  • communication of design ideas
  • prototype development
  • selection of materials and components
  • tolerances
  • material management
  • specialist tools and equipment
  • specialist techniques and processes

Students will focus on their chosen material category whilst they are learning about design and making principles.


Assessment

There are two elements to the assessment of GCSE Design and Technology.

Written Exam

  • Core technical principles (20 marks)
  • Specialist technical principles (30 marks)
  • Design and Making Principles (50 marks)
  • 100 marks overall
    • at least 15% of the paper will assess maths
    • at least 10% of the paper will assess science
  • 2 hours
  • 50% of the overall GCSE

Non-Exam Assessment

A non-exam assessment will assess the practical application of core technical principles, specialist technical principles and, design and making principles.

  • 100 marks
  • Approximately 35 hours
  • 50% of the overall GCSE

Each year the contexts for the NEA are released by AQA on the 1st of June in the year prior to submission.


Home Learning

  • Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework.
  • As well as completing their weekly homework task students are encouraged to spend time developing their sketching and designing skills.
  • Students will have access to online CAD software at home and it would be beneficial if students used our tutorial videos to further develop skills they have learnt at school.

Where can Design Technology take you?

Further Study

  • GCSE Design and Technology
  • A Level Design and Technology: Product Design
  • Vocational Qualifications in areas such as building, computing, construction, design, engineering, fashion, manufacturing and textiles
  • Apprenticeships in areas such as building, CAD, construction, engineering, fashion and textiles, graphic design, manufacturing and planning
  • Degree courses in areas such as architecture , design and engineering

Careers

Many exciting careers require the practical and problem solving skills that D&T provides and the demand for people in these areas of work is growing.

  • Design
  • Manufacturing
  • Engineering

How parents can support their child's learning

  • Discuss your child’s learning with them on a regular basis, ask them what learnt in their lesson, ask your child to teach you something that they learnt today as this will help to consolidate their learning.
  • Encourage your child to analyse products in the home, if a product isn’t solving a particular problem ask your child how it could be improved.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mr D.Hill, Head of Design and Technology, Townsend Church of England School

Drama

Course Details

AQA GCSE Drama 8261

  • This is a course with a huge practical focus, and a substantial performance component. The opportunities to use the skills gained in Drama across other subjects and career paths are very beneficial for students.
  • Specification - https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/drama/gcse/drama-8261

Course Description

Component 1 & 2 - Understanding Drama and set text study

This area includes understanding the characteristics of a performance and how meaning is interpreted and communicated on stage, also Drama terminology and the roles and responsibilities of theatre makes are also explored. Students must study and explore practically a chosen set text and develop knowledge and understanding of the characteristics and context of the whole play.

Component 3 - Live Theatre Evaluation

Students will learn how to analyse and evaluate the work of live theatre makers after seeing a performance on stage.

Component 4 - Devising Drama

Students can choose to be assessed as a performer or as a designer and then work in a company to devise a piece of drama learning how to develop ideas and communicate meaning in performance. They will create a devising log of the process and then perform their created piece.

Component 5 - Texts in practice

Students will choose 2 extracts from the set play and choose to be assessed as a performer or a designer. The performance must show their understanding of the characteristics and context of the play through pervious experimentation and study with the text.


Programme of Study

Year 9

Introduction to GCSE -Drama Works

  • confidence, team work, time management, problem solving, imagination

Mini Play

  • working with text, research for SCHP, aspects in a text, page to stage development

Guided Devising

  • core devising skills, research for SCHP, team work, time management, confidence, using a stimuli

DNA text study

  • Working with text, research for SCHP, aspects in a text, page to stage development

Set text study 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller

  • Exploration of text, exam technique, exploration of SCHP and characterisation, introduction to basic design elements

Year 10 

Design elements

  • Understanding of: lighting, set, costume, sounds, puppetry

Live theatre review

  • Evaluation skills, essay writing technique, key word vocabulary build up

Devising

  • core devising skills, research for SCHP, team work, time management, confidence, using a stimulus

Introduction to the set text 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller / Structure of theatre

  • Understanding the roles in theatre, basic history of theatre knowledge
  • Working with text, research for SCHP aspects in a text, page to stage development

Year 11 

Set Text 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller

  • Exploring the set text through practical workshops - physical and interpretation skills

Component 3 texts in practise and Set text

  • Practical skills of interpreting text and character in a performance

Component 3 texts in practice and Live theatre visit and review

  • Practical skills of interpreting text and character in a performance

Assessment

This course consists of:

  • 40% Examination - A 1hr 45min examination paper, open book with 3 sections (multiple choice, extract from set play, live theatre review).
  • 60% Performance and coursework - Two units (Unit 2 = 40%, Unit 3 = 20%), each containing one performance/design skill and a devising log (coursework) in Unit 2.

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework and include activities such as:

  •  completing self-evaluation upon practical work in class
  •  learning lines
  •  researching social, cultural, historical and political aspects of plays, playwrights and genres   of theatre
  •  exam style questions on theatre knowledge, set text or live theatre review

As well as completing the weekly homework tasks, students should be reading through their texts & class notes after each lesson to check what they understood, so they can ask their teacher questions or for more help if needed, as well as to help them store the information learnt in their long term memory.

To help them with revision for the exams, students should create revision resources for each topic as they are learning them, rather than leave it all to the end, as this will save them time in year 11, and also help store the information in their long term memory as they will be recalling it more regularly.


Where can Drama take you?

Further Study

  • A level Drama/Theatre Studies
  • BTEC Performing Arts Level 3
  • Degrees in Performing Arts, Theatre Design, Media, Drama Therapy

Careers

  • Drama teacher
  • Director
  • Professional Actor
  • Designer (costume, lighting, sound, set etc.)
  • Theatre Manager
  • Producer
  • Theatre Technician
  • Drama Therapist

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  • Get your child to teach you something they learnt today, see if they can help you remember it, as this will help ensure they understand it and consolidate their own learning.
  • Get your child to regularly create revision posters / flash cards to help recap information
  •  Use your child’s workbooks / revision posters / flash cards to ask them questions and test their knowledge / help them to revise it regularly e.g. on a car journey, whilst making/eating dinner.
  • Encourage your child to take part in Drama clubs in and out of school and support them with it
  • Watch live or recorded theatre with your child, and ask them questions that would relate to GCSE Drama theory, such as; What vocal or physical skills is that actor using? How does the lighting reflect the mood/atmosphere? What are the actors doing well? How does the set help reflect the era of the play? Are the costumes correct for the time and setting of the play?

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Head of Drama, Townsend Church of England School

Engineering

Course Details

NCFE Level 1/2 Technical Award in Engineering


Course Description

  • This qualification is designed for students who want an introduction to engineering that includes a vocational and project-based element.
  • The qualification will appeal to students who wish to pursue a career in the engineering sector or progress to further study.
  • The study of engineering is the application of maths and science to solve real world problems. This involves an understanding of the different disciplines of engineering and how they have shaped the products and projects of the modern world.
  • Students will be able to read technical drawings, select appropriate materials along with tools and machinery, and know how to carry out a practical task, working in a safe manner in line with current health and safety legislation.
  • The qualification is graded:
    • Level 1 Pass/Merit/Distinction/Distinction*
    • Level 2 Pass/Merit/Distinction/Distinction* (equivalent to GCSE grades 8.5–1).

Programme of Study

Throughout this qualification, your learners will gain valuable knowledge of:

  • Engineering disciplines
  • The science and mathematics that is applied in engineering
  • How to read engineering drawings
  • Properties and characteristics of engineering materials and know why specific materials are selected for engineering applications
  • Engineering tools, equipment and machines
  • Production planning techniques
  • Processing skills and techniques applied to materials for a manufacturing task equipment.

1) Unit 1: Understanding the Engineering World

  • Students will develop knowledge and understanding of how different engineering disciplines have shaped the world we live in.
  • Students will gain an understanding of how science and maths are applied to engineering solutions and how to read and interpret engineering drawings.
  • Students will have the opportunity to explore the properties and characteristics of materials in relation to why specific materials are selected for engineering applications.
  • Students will understand use of tools and equipment within the engineering industry.

2) Unit 2: Skills and Techniques in Engineering

  • Students will produce hand drafted and Computer-Aided Design (CAD) engineering drawings.
  • Students will produce a production plan for the manufacture of an engineered product which will demonstrate the application of skills and techniques to prepare, mark-out, modify, join and finish materials.

Assessment

This qualification has two assessments: one external written examination and one internal synoptic project.

1)  External Written Exam: Unit 1: Understanding the Engineering World

  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 80 marks
  • 40% of overall GCSE

The exam will consist of a mixture of multiple-choice, short-answer and extended-response questions.

2) Synoptic Project

The synoptic project will assess the learner’s ability to effectively draw together their knowledge, understanding and skills from across the whole subject.

  • 21 hours
  • 60% of overall GCSE
  • the project which will be externally set by NCFE, internally graded by the centre and externally quality assured by NCFE.

 

 

NCFE have published 3 example project portfolios, please follow the links below to have a look.


Home Study

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework.


Where can Engineering take you?

Further Study

There are a wide range of opportunities for further study for learners who complete this qualification:

  • A Level in Design Technology or Physics
  • Level 2 Technical Certificate in Engineering
  • Level 3 Applied General in Engineering
  • Level 3 Technical Level in Engineering
  • An apprenticeship sector such as Aerospace Engineer or an Electrical/Electronic Support Engineer or Engineer
  • A wide range of university courses for those wishing to pursue a career in engineering

Careers

  • Aerospace Engineer
  • Agricultural Engineer
  • Automotive Engineer
  • Biomedical Engineer
  • Civil Engineer
  • Computer Engineer
  • Design Engineer
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Software Engineer

How parents can support their child's learning

  • Discuss your child’s learning with them on a regular basis, ask them what learnt in their lesson, ask your child to teach you something that they learnt today as this will help to consolidate their learning.

Useful Links

The links below will assist students with various aspects of Unit 1.


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mr D.Hill, Head of Design and Technology, Townsend Church of England School

English

Course Details

GCSE English Language AQA 8700

GCSE English Literature AQA 8702


Course Description

  • The course enables students to develop their skills in reading and writing and gives them the opportunity to appreciate a broad range of texts. The texts include travel articles, diary entries, speeches and occasional extracts from A level literature to hopefully inspire further study. Reading and writing form an equal part of the course as reflected in the final examinations.
  • It is hoped that a love of literature will develop over the course of study and remain with the students far beyond their school years.
  • Students receive four lessons of English a week in which they study both English Language and English Literature. Students are encouraged to read as widely as possible from a range of genres to develop their vocabulary, turn of phrase and to more fully understand why writers make the decisions that they do.

Programme of Study

English Language

  • In order to develop their reading skills, students study a range of short texts such as: non-fiction, fiction, contemporary and traditional writing and writing with a variety of narrative voices.
  • In the final examination students must analyse Pre 1900s or a Pre 20th Century text and the programme of study ensure that students are given material that contains this archaic, challenging language.

English Literature

  • For their study of English Literature students study the following texts:
    • Paper 1: ‘A Christmas Carol’ and ‘Macbeth’.
    • Paper 2 :‘An Inspector Calls’ and poetry from the power and conflict cluster.
  • Students also study poetry that is not part of the anthology collection to prepare them for the unseen poetry section of the final examination.

Assessment

English Language

Paper 1 - Exploration in creative reading and writing

  • 80 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE

Paper 2 - Writer's viewpoints and perspectives

  • 80 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE

English Literature

Paper 1 - Shakespeare and the 19th Century novel

  • 64 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 40% of overall GCSE

Paper 2 - Modern texts and poetry

  • 96 marks
  • 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 60% of overall GCSE

In Year 10 students also undertake a Spoken Language task which takes the form of a presentation to the class on a topic of their choice. This component does not count towards the final examination grade but their grade for this task will appear on their results.


Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks to complete each week, these tasks will be uploaded to smhw. Tasks will include:

  • practising close analysis skills
  • answering specific exam questions
  • annotating unseen poems
  • revising specific texts
  • annotating Language extracts

Where can English take you

Further Study

Both English Language and English Literature prepare students well for a variety of subjects at Advanced Level including:

  • A Level English Literature.

Careers

  • Journalism
  • Teacher
  • Writer
  • Critic
  • Editor
  • University Lecturer
  • Researcher
  • Law
  • Public Relations Officer
  • Newscaster
  • Broadcaster
  • Web content Manager
  • Newspaper/Magazine Editor
  • Librarian

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Engage in a frequent dialogue about what books your child is studying in English and how they feel about the book they are studying
  • Encourage your child to read as much as possible from a broad range of genres. Broadsheet Newspapers are also valuable and inform students about not only what is topical but also introduce them to journalese language and opinion-based writing
  • Encourage your child to make posters and flashcards containing key quotations, key characters and key themes from the set Literature texts
  • Quiz your child on their texts
  • Encourage your child to practise responses in timed conditions both for English Language and English Literature

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs P.Harris, Head of English, Townsend Church of England School

Geography

Course Details

GCSE Geography, AQA (9-1)

specification - https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/geography/specifications/AQA-8035-SP-2016.PDF


Course Description

  • The Geography Department have a vision to provide a full and contemporary geography curriculum to our students. We want our students to be able to understand the human and physical world and the interactions between these systems.
  • This in short is to enable our students to “Think like Geographers”, by being able to analyse information to interpret the world around them, to care for the world around them and to understand how actions have consequences. We want students to understand their place in the UK and the world and their role within it, to be conscious of sustainability, equality and diversity and how to be responsible citizens.
  • Our students will learn about human and physical processes, geographical skills and places, contemporary issues, have a sense of time and spatial scales and be able to understand the complexity of life on Earth.
  • The Geography department is committed to flexible and enquiry based approaches to learning, with discussions, debates and group work, computer-based exercises and audio-visual presentations. Clear explanations will be given about all of the topics being studied along with advice about examination technique. There will be a compulsory fieldtrip that will inform part of paper 3 (Geographical applications).

Programme of Study

Living with the physical environment

  • Section A: The challenge of natural hazards
  • Section B: The living world
  • Section C: Physical landscapes in the UK

Challenges in the human environment

  • Section A: Urban issues and challenges
  • Section B: The changing economic world
  • Section C: The challenge of resource management

Geographical applications

  • Section A: Issue evaluation
  • Section B: Fieldwork

Year 9

  • 1A - The challenge of natural hazards
    • natural hazards, tectonic hazards, climate change
  • 2A - Urban issues and challenges
    • the urban world, urban change in the UK, urban sustainability
  • 1C - Physical landscapes in the UK
    • UK landscapes, rivers, coasts

Year 10

  • 2B - The changing economic World
    • the development gap, the changing UK economy
  • 1B - The living World
    • ecosystems, tropical rain-forests, hot deserts
  • 3B/3C - Field work and geographical skills
    • field trip, field work write-up, statistics, graphs, map skills

Year 11

  • 2C - The challenge of resource management
    • resource management, water
  • 3A - Issue evaluation
    • preparation using pre-release material

Assessment

Students are assessed within lessons by questioning, teacher verbal assessment and monitoring of progress and whilst learning and completing exam technique work. Teachers also assess student progress via book marking. Students are assessed formally at the end of each unit with a test using exam questions. Students complete exam questions throughout the course weekly in lessons and for homework as well as the end of unit assessments. They learn how the mark schemes and assessment objectives work to help them master exam technique throughout the course.

Paper 1 - Living with the Physical Environment

  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 88 marks
  • 35% of total mark

Paper 2 - Challenges in the Human Environment

  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 88 marks
  • 35% of total mark

Paper 3 – Geographical Applications

  • 1 hour 15 minutes
  • 76 marks
  • 30% of total marks

Home Learning

Home learning is set in accordance with the school home learning policy and timetable. Occasionally extra work will be set, for example:

  • Preparation for an upcoming assessment
  • Preparation for fieldwork.
  • Practice Exam Questions
  • Past Papers

Where can Geography take you

  • Geography is a popular and useful subject because it spans the sciences, the arts and the humanities in terms of skills, knowledge and understanding. It is therefore thought of highly by employers, colleges and universities.
  • It helps to develop your written and verbal communication skills and heightens your graphical, statistical and analytical skills.
  • It also teaches specialist skills that are applicable to everyday life like map reading, interpreting images/graphs/maps and so on.
  • In geography you will work alone, in pairs and groups and with people outside of your friendship circle, you will therefore be highly employable with many skills, substantial knowledge of the world we live in and you are likely to be comfortable working with others and talking to people. This is why Geography is so valued by employers and higher education.

Further Study

  • A Levels, College Courses, Apprenticeships and Degrees in
    • Geography
    • Geology
    • Environmental Sciences
    • Earth Sciences
    • Environmental Issues
    • Hazard Management
    • Town Planning
    • Civil Service
    • Conservation

Careers

The list of career options geography is popular for is so vast, ranging from subject specific jobs such as:

  • volcanologist
  • teacher
  • cartographer
  • GIS programmer
  • meteorologists
  • hazard planners
  • oceanographers
  • careers in the armed forces
  • police
  • government
  • marketing,
  • media
  • law and medicine

Due to the skills set acquired there are many wide ranging jobs that studying geography can lead to, such as:

  • catastrophe modeller/hazard management
  • landscape architect
  • journalist
  • environmental lawyer
  • weather forecaster/meteorologist
  • town planner/designer
  • wildlife management
  • photographer
  • business management
  • retail

further details follow the web link: http://www.rgs.org/OurWork/Schools/Careers+and+Further+Study/Careers+with+geography


How can parents support their child's learning

Encourage your child to get outdoors and explore the natural world and to be aware of processes in the human world, like economics, politics and development. Encourage your child to question the world they live in and try to find out answers. In short – be interested in the world, not just their immediate surroundings. Read or watch the news, take an interest in wildlife and habitats and issues that affect people like climate change, energy consumption and how our country and other countries are governed. Watch documentaries, wildlife and travel programmes and films located in different places. Read about far flung places and explorers and adventures, get an atlas and study where places are in comparison to others.

  • BBC iPlayer – documentaries about the natural world (Blue Planet, Planet Earth, Planets, Earth: Power of the Planet)
  • You Tube – videos about hundreds of topics
  • Ted Talks
  • Films (e.g. An Inconvenient Truth & the sequel, Koyaanisqatsi, Erin Brockovitch, Plastic China, Made in Cambodia, One Day on Earth)
  • Travel Documentaries – find out about faraway places and life in other areas of the world

Useful Links

GCSE Pod (all students are provided with details about the app and login details when they start GCSE’s), Seneca Learning and BBC Bitesize are all excellent resources to support home learning. Revision guides are available to buy from the Head of Geography.


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs M. Buckland, Head of Geography, Townsend Church of England School

History

Course Details

GCSE History 1-9 - Edexcel


Course Description

The GCSE History qualification aims to engage students with a broad and diverse study of the history of Britain – and the wider world – and give students skills that will support progression to further study of history and a wide range of other subjects. This course builds on the content and skills of Key Stage 3 and provides a sensible progression of content to ‘A’ level, with similar approaches to assessment.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the periods studied.
  • Explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second-order historical concepts (similarity, difference, change, continuity, consequence, significance, and causation).
  • Analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied.
  • Analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied.

Programme of Study

Year 9

  • First World War, 1914-18 (non-examined module)
  • Paper 1: Crime and Punishment in Britain, c1000-present
  • Paper 2: Whitechapel, c1870-c1900: crime, policing and the inner city

Year 10

  • Paper 2a: Early Elizabethan England, 1558-88
  • Paper 2b: The American West, c1835-c1895

Year 11

  • Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1928-39

Assessment

All three papers will be sat at the end of the three-year course. In addition to class assessment there will be regular assessment of subject knowledge and skills through the completion of exam style questions.  An exam will be completed at the end of Year 9 and 10 assessing the units studied in these years.  There will be mock exams in Year 11.

Paper 1 - Crime and Punishment in Britain, c1000-present and Whitechapel, c1870-c1900: crime, policing and the inner city

  • 52 marks
  • 1 hour 15 minutes
  • 30% of overall GCSE

Paper 2 - Early Elizabethan England, 1558-88, and the American West, c1835-95.

  • 64 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 40% of overall GCSE

Paper 3 - Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-39

  • 53 marks
  • 1 hour 20 minutes
  • 30% of overall GCSE

Home Learning

The aim of each home learning task is to develop the knowledge and skill required for the course.

These will include regular;

  • glossary tests of key terms
  • exam style questions
  • production of revision guides and materials for future use by the students.

Where can History take you

The skills acquired through the study of History, at any level, are invaluable for an array of career paths, further study, and lifelong passions. Those listed below show just a few which have a direct and indirect relation to the subject.

Further Study

  • A Level History
  • Humanities
  • Social Sciences

Careers

Careers related directly to History:

  • Heritage manager
  • Historic buildings inspector or conservation officer
  • Museum education officer
  • Museum or gallery curator
  • Museum or gallery exhibitions officer
  • Teaching

Careers where the qualification would be useful:

  • Editorial assistant
  • Information officer
  • Politician’s assistant
  • Law
  • Management consultancies
  • Publishing companies
  • Television and radio broadcasters.

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can discuss with the students how they plan to manage their time for the home learning tasks and revision for assessments.
  • We strongly encourage students to gain background research from books rather than the internet as it is often age-inappropriate for students and the school’s Discovery Centre, local libraries and books at home would all be helpful to students deepening their knowledge and understand of the topics studied.
  • Visiting historical sites and encouraging discussion about the topics studied in class is also useful.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs J. Bailey, Head of History, Townsend Church of England School

Mathematics

Course Details

The Mathematics Department have decided to adopt a five-year scheme of learning, developed by White Rose Maths, that premised on the concept of mathematics mastery and covers both Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4.

At GCSE students take an exam based on the AQA syllabus.


Course Description  

The aim of this course and the Mathematics Depatment is to develop a culture of deep understanding, confidence and competence in maths – a culture that produces strong, secure learning and real progress. No matter what their starting points, we strive to facilitate learners to achieve excellence. We believe everyone can do Maths. As we prove this to pupils, we’re hoping to shape assured, happy and resilient mathematicians who relish the challenge of maths and to become independent, reflective thinkers, whose skills not only liberate them in maths but also support them across the curriculum. We’re committed to working together to be and give the very best, and to make a difference to every pupil.


Programme of Study

Year 9

Term 1

  • Straight Line Graphs
  • Forming and Solving Equations
  • Testing conjectures
  • Three Dimensional Shapes
  • Constructions and Congruency

Term 2

  • Numbers
  • Using Percentages
  • Maths and Money
  • Deduction
  • Rotation and Translation
  • Pythagoras' Theorem

Term 3

  • Enlargement and Similarity
  • Solving Ratio and Proportion Problems
  • Solving Problems Using Graphs, Tables and Algebra

Year 10

Term 1

  • Geometry
  • Developing Algebra
  • Congruence, Similarity and Enlargement
  • Trigonometry
  • Representing Solutions of Equations and Inequalities
  • Simultaneous Equations

Term 2

  • Geometry
  • Proportions and Proportional Change
  • Angles and Bearings
  • Working With Circles
  • Vectors
  • Ratios and Fractions
  • Percentages and Interest
  • Probability

Term 3

  • Delving into Data
  • Using Number
  • Collecting, Representing and Interpreting Data
  • Non-Calculator Methods
  • Types of Number and Sequences
  • Indices and Roots

Year 11

Term 1

  • Gradients and Lines
  • Non-Linear Graphs
  • Using Graphs
  • Expanding and Factorising
  • Changing the Subject
  • Functions

Term 2

  • Multiplicative Reasoning
  • Geometric Reasoning
  • Algebraic Reasoning
  • Transformations and Constructions
  • Listing and Describing
  • Show That.....

Term 3

  • Revision
  • Examinations

Assessment

  • Assessment is conducted using End of Block tests, End of Term tests and End of Year tests all culminating into a final GCSE exam at the end of Year 11.
  • The examination is offered at two tiers of entry; Higher tier covers grades 9-4, and Foundation tier grades 5-1. Assessment consists of 3 exam papers; two calculator papers and one non-calculator paper. These are taken at the end of Year 11.
  • Each paper consists of a mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step problems. The mathematical demand increases as a student progresses through the paper.

Paper 1 -Non-Calculator

  • 80 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 33.33% of the overall GCSE

Paper 2 - Non-Calculator

  • 80 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 33.33% of the overall GCSE

Paper 3 - Calculator

  • 80 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 33.33% of the overall GCSE

Home Learning

The Mathematics Department subscribes to two main websites for home learning (alongside the White Rose Maths home learning resources) these are MyMaths and Mathswatch, tasks will be set on these platforms in addition to other tasks set by class teachers.


Where can Mathematics take you

Maths is one of the most respected subjects to achieve a qualification in, and the breadth of applications is immense. Mathematics underpins most of science, technology and engineering and is also important in areas as diverse as business, law, nutrition, sports science and psychology. There are many opportunities to use Maths to make a difference in society, for example through the analysis involved in medical research, developing new technology, modelling epidemics or in the study of patterns of criminal activity to identify trends. Studying Mathematics develops problem solving and logic skills, but also provides opportunities to develop team-working skills, resilience, effective communication and the ability to use your own initiative.

Further Study

  • A Level Mathematics
  • A Level Further Maths

Careers

  • Finance- Actuarial Work, Accountancy, Financial Modelling, Investment Banking
  • Computing- Games Design, Internet Security,  Telecommunications
  • Mathematical Biology- Population Modelling, Epidemics and Vaccination
  • Engineering- Aircraft Modelling, Fluid Flows, Acoustic Engineering, Quantity Surveyor, Planner
  • Teaching and Lecturing
  • Statistics- Medical Statistics, Market Research, Government Statistics
  • Business- Logistics, Traffic Planning, Project Management, Business Consultancy

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ensure that your child uses the internet learning tutorials effectively, possibly sitting with them and learning the Mathematics skills together.
  • Always try to take opportunities to use Mathematics and problem solving in real life contexts with your child: best buys at the supermarket; exchange rates for currency; conversion of measurements; utility bills; interest repayments on loans, mortgages or interest on investments; percentage increase/decrease; card/dice/board games; code-breaking etc.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Head of Mathematics, Townsend Church of England School

Media Studies

Course Details

GCSE Media Studies, Eduqas.


Course Description

GCSE Media Studies engages students in the in depth study of media products in relation to the four areas of the theoretical framework:

  • media language
  • media representation
  • media industries
  • media audiences.

Students will need to consider aspects of style, presentation, values, audience and representation and show their understanding of the relevant codes and conventions. Students need to show awareness of new technologies involved in the production and consumption of the media. Students will explore current debates and audience issues, as well as issues of bias and representation. Production skills will be expected with candidates showing effective practical skills such as storyboarding, scripting, selecting and editing and other design skills appropriate to the topic.


Programme of Study

Component 1 - Exploring the Media - 40%

This component provides a foundation for analysing media products, introducing learners to media language and representation through the study of print media forms. Learners will develop their ability to analyse media language, representations and meanings in a range of media products. In addition, learners will study products from specific media industries and audiences to develop their knowledge and understanding of those areas of the theoretical framework. Learners will also begin to explore how media products reflect, and are influenced by, the social, cultural, historical and political contexts in which they are produced. The following media forms will be studied: Newspapers, advertising and marketing, magazines, radio, video games and film.

Component 2 - Understanding Media Forms and Products - 30%

This component builds on the introduction to key areas of the theoretical framework provided in Component 1. In Component 2, learners will gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of media language and representation, as well as extending their appreciation of these areas through the study of media industries and audiences. Learners will also develop knowledge and understanding of how relevant social, cultural, political and historical contexts of media influence media products. In this component learners will explore particular media forms in depth through both of the following topics:

  1. Television: crime drama or sitcom
  2. Music: music video and online media.

Component 3 - Creating Media Products - 30%

This component draws together knowledge and understanding of the media theoretical framework gained throughout their course by requiring learners to apply their knowledge and understanding of the media synoptically through practical production. In Components 1 and 2, learners gain a detailed understanding of media language, representation and audience in relation to a range of media forms. In this component, learners must apply their knowledge and understanding of media language and representation to an individual media production for an intended audience in response to a choice of briefs set by the exam board.


Assessment

Component 1 - Exploring the Media

  • Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 40% of qualification
  • 80 marks

Component 2 - Understanding Media Forms and Products

  • Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 30% of qualification
  • 60 marks

Component 3 - Creating Media Products

  • Non-exam assessment: internally assessed and externally moderated by WJEC
  • 30% of qualification
  • 60 marks

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework and include activities such as: analysing media texts, reading newspapers, creating a media product.

As well as completing the weekly homework tasks, students should be reading through their class notes after each lesson to check what they understood, so they can ask their teacher questions or for more help if needed, as well as to help them store the information learnt in their long term memory.  Creating revision materials throughout the course has aided students when it comes to revising when exams approach.


Where can Media take you

Further Study

  • A Levels / College courses in:
    • Performing arts
    • Broadcast
    • Publishing
    • Journalism
    • Advertising and marketing
    • Film Studies
    • Media Management
    • Television Studies

Careers

This course allows students to gain an insight into all types of information and the ways in which we receive it, this is a valuable skill and would be beneficial in a number of jobs including:

  • Advertising
  • Broadcasting
  • Social networking
  • Design
  • Film production
  • ICT, journalism
  • Music
  • Publishing
  • Sales

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Encourage your child to question what they see or hear in the media.
  • Encourage your child to stay up to date with what is in the news.
  • Encourage your child to explore a range of media products including newspapers and radio.
  • Take an interest in your child’s learning when completing work at home.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss E. Scott, Townsend Church of England School

Modern Foreign Langauges

Course Details

Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9-1) in French (1FR0)


Course Description

  • The Pearson Edexcel Level 2 GCSE in French (9-1) allows students to develop their ability to communicate with French native speakers in both speech and writing. They study across a variety of contexts relevant to their age and interests and develop a greater awareness of culture of French-speaking communities and countries.
  • Students should already enjoy their French lessons and have an interest in developing their linguistic skills further and a desire to learn more about the cultures of countries where French is spoken. Students will need to develop and use their knowledge and understanding of French grammar and vocabulary progressively through their course of study.
  • Students have five one-hour GCSE French lessons per fortnight and to achieve the highest grades in this subject, students should be prepared to complete some independent study each week in addition to set homework. This does not necessarily always have to be grammar practice and could take the form of listening to French speech radio or music or watching French language films

Programme of Study

Content for the course is organised into five themes, each broken down into topics and sub-topics. Students follow the programme of study which is designed around these themes, developing their grammatical and vocabulary knowledge in addition to speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

1) Identity and Culture

  • Relationships; when I was younger; what my friends and family are like; what makes a good friend; interests; socialising with friends and family; role models
  • Daily life: customs and everyday life; food and drink; shopping; social media and technology (use of, advantages and disadvantages)
  • Cultural life: celebrations and festivals; reading; music; sport; film and television

2) Local Area, Holiday and Travel

  • Holidays: preferences; experiences; destinations
  • Travel and tourist transactions: travel and accommodation; asking for help and dealing with problems; directions; eating out; shopping
  • Town, region and country: weather; places to see; things to do

3) School

  • What school is like: school types; school day; subjects; rules and pressures; celebrating success
  • School activities: school trips; events and exchanges

4) Future Aspirations, Study and Work

  • Using languages beyond the classroom: forming relationships; travel; employment
  • Ambitions: further study; volunteering; training
  • Work: jobs; careers and professions

5) International and Global Dimension

  • Bringing the world together: sports events; music events; campaigns and good causes
  • Environmental issues: being ‘green’; access to natural resources

Assessment

Assessment is 100% by examination. Each paper is available at Foundation tier or Higher tier. However, students must be entered for a single tier across all papers.

Paper 1: Listening

  • 25% of overall GCSE
  • Foundation Tier: 35 minutes / Higher Tier: 45 minutes
  • Students will be required to recognise and respond to structures and vocabulary drawn from the five specified common topic areas.
  • Students are assessed on their understanding of standard spoken French in a range of public and social settings. They will respond to multiple-response and short-answer questions based on a recording.

Paper 2: Speaking in French

  • 25% of overall GCSE
  • Foundation tier: 7-9 minutes plus 12 minutes preparation time / Higher tier: 10-12 minutes plus 12 minutes preparation time
  • Students are assessed on their ability to communicate and interact effectively through speaking in French for different purposes and in different settings.
  • The speaking exam comprises three tasks: 1) a role-play 2) a series of questions based on a picture stimulus 3) A conversation based on two themes.

Paper 3: Reading and Understanding in French

  • 25% of overall GCSE
  • Foundation tier: 45 minutes / Higher tier: 1 hour
  • Students will be required to recognise and respond to structures and vocabulary drawn from the five specified common topic areas.
  • Students are assessed on their understanding of written French across a range of different types of texts, including advertisements, emails, letters, articles and literary texts.
  • Section C includes a translation passage from French into English.

Paper 4: Writing in French

  • 25% of overall GCSE
  • Foundation tier: 1 hour 10 minutes / Higher tier: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Students are assessed on their ability to communicate effectively through writing in French for different purposes and audiences. They are required to produce extended responses of varying lengths and types to express ideas and opinions in French.
  • Foundation tier – three extended response questions and one translation into French
  • Higher tier – two extended response questions and one translation into French.

Home Learning

Students will be given a homework task each week which should take approximately 45 minutes to complete. These will be set in class and published on Show My Homework and include activities such as:

  • Grammar practice exercise to reinforce learning in class
  • Reading comprehension tasks
  • Research of an aspect of French culture
  • Writing assignments on one of the key themes
  • Vocabulary revision

In addition to the set homework, students should also be completing some independent French study. To help support students to do this, each term pupils are provided with independent learning log sheet to record their independent learning activities each week and these are shared with peers and their class teacher at regular intervals.


Where can French take you

Learning a language will be an advantage in almost any career which relies on excellent communication and interpersonal skills and top companies list French as one of the languages they would most like their employees to know.

Further Study

Taking GCSE French means you will:

  • Add an extra dimension to your personal skills profile which will impress anyone who reads your CV Be in a stronger position to get a job in companies with international links or improve employability if you would like to work abroad
  • Be able to work or study in a French-speaking country in later life
  • Be able to study A level French courses to further your knowledge of the language and culture
  • Find it easier to learn other languages later if you want to.

Careers

  • teacher, private tutor or online tutor
  • interpreter
  • translator
  • blogger, speaker and seller
  • YouTuber or podcaster
  • tour guide
  • liaison officer
  • charities administrator
  • human resources officer
  • journalist
  • logistics/distribution manager

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ask your child to about what they have learnt in their French lesson.
  • Get your child to teach you something they learnt today, as this will help ensure they understand it and consolidate their own learning
  • Encourage your child to complete their independent learning weekly and ask them to show you their independent learning log.
  • Help your child to revise by testing them using their exercise books /revision materials, so they can identify gaps in their knowledge.
  • Encourage your child to take an interest in the francophone (French speaking) world including current affairs and culture.

Useful Links

This is the online version of the Edexcel French GCSE textbook. Students have individual login and password details and exercises have been set to allow students to access at home and revise. The particular advantage of using this package to revise is that it is created by the exam board we use for GCSE French to support their GCSE textbook and covers the topics, vocabulary and structures which will come up in the exams. There are grammar, reading and listening activities.

This package provides grammar and comprehension exercises using recordings of native French speakers. Students have individual login and password details and exercises can be set to allow students to access at home and revise. Students revise by completing exercises and play interactive games.

French GCSE revision exercises covering topics from our programme of study. A good way to revise grammar and key vocabulary whilst on the go.

This package is familiar to students from KS3 but the intermediate section is suitable for KS4 revision. User ID townsend, password language19.


For More Information, Contact:

Head of MFL, Townsend Church of England School

Music

Course Details

GCSE Music - (9-1) - OCR J536


Course Description

The GCSE Music course provides a contemporary, accessible and creative education in Music with an integrated approach to the three main elements - performing, composing and appraising.

  • Learners are encouraged to be creative and to
    broaden their musical horizons and understanding
    with Areas of Study that inspire and challenge.
  • It will enable learners to explore
    performance and composition with a focus on their
    own instrument and genre choices and offer
    opportunity to explore new instrumental skills.
  • Through the various genres, styles and eras contained
    in the Areas of Study they will explore musical
    context, musical language, and performance and
    composition skills.

Programme of Study

My Music

  • A study of your chosen instrument and style - this can be any genre of your choosing. Students are given free weekly instrumental lessons in order to pursue their own chosen musical paths.

The Concerto Through Time

  • A study of the development of the Concerto from 1650 - 1910, including the conventions of the Baroque, Classical and Romantic periods.

Rhythms of the World

  • A study f the rhythmic roots of four geographical regions: India, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America.

Film Music

  • A study of how music can depict moods and characters and how this is use to enhance the dramatic and emotional content of films and video games.

Conventions of Pop

  • A study of a wide variety of popular music genres ranging from 1950s rock and roll to contemporary solo artists.

Assessment

Integrated Portfolio

  • Students produce an individual performance and a linked composition in the style of your choice (Area of study 1)

Practical Component

  • 30% (Coursework/Controlled Assessment)
  • Students produce an ensemble performance and a composition written to a brief supplied by the exam board.

Listening and Appraising

  • 40% (Examination)
  • Students sit a 90 minute listening test assessing understanding of areas of study 2-5

Additional Qualifications

  • The assessment system values music extremely highly allowing a variety of music qualifications to be included in a student's attainment.
  • Individual practical and theory music exams taken during KS4 can be submitted
  • Students are given the opportunity in year 10 to complete practical work that contributes to a BTEC in Performing Arts.
  • Some students will therefore finish year 11 with three or even four qualifications.

Home Learning

  • Students will be given homework to support classroom activities
  • Students will be given work in class on a weekly basis that needs to be completed at home, which will include practical as well as music theory-related work.
  • Students are expected to practice their principal instrument at home on a regular basis.

Where can Music take you

Music GCSE, if studied diligently, will leave the student very well prepared for further music study in College and University, and opens a path leading to music as a profession.

Further Study

 Careers

  • Performer
  • Teacher
  • Composer
  • Music technology
  • Recording
  • Music therapy
  • Music production

How can parents support their child's learning

  • ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  • ask your child to play or sing the pieces they are working on in class
  • All GCSE Music students should decide on one, or more, principal instrument/s, and should practice the instrument on a daily basis. To help facilitate practice, parents should take an interest and help the student to have a space with some privacy and without too much interruption for a specified period of practice time.

Useful Links


For More Information, Contact:

Head of Music, Townsend Church of England School

Physical Education

Course Details

GCSE PE (9-1), OCR - J587


Course Description

  • The GCSE PE course requires students to develop their knowledge and understanding of physical education, physical activity and the importance of leading a healthy and active lifestyle, both through classroom study and through practical performance.
  • Students have three one-hour GCSE PE lessons, in addition to their two compulsory one-hour lessons in core PE. Two lesson each week is in a classroom, with written homework set on a weekly basis. In GCSE PE students work in mixed-gender groups.
  • Students should already enjoy their PE lessons and have an interest in studying about the importance of leading a healthy and active lifestyle.
  • It is imperative that students are taking part in sports competitively both in and out of school as they have to keep a record of all competitive matches / events they take part in for 3 sports for their practical assessment.
  • In order to achieve higher grades in the practical assessment, students should be competing in at least 1 of their sports outside of school, and a minimum of 3 sports in school, representing the school in fixtures.

Programme of Study

The course contains 3 sections:

1) Physical Factors Affecting Performance

  • Skeletal system
  • Muscular system
  • Respiratory system
  • Cardiovascular system
  • Short and long-term effects of an active, healthy lifestyle
  • Aerobic and anaerobic exercise and training
  • Components of fitness
  • Principles of training
  • Methods of training
  • Prevention of injury

2) Socio-cultural Issues and Sport Psychology

  • Participation levels of sport in the UK
  • Commercialisation of sport
  • Ethics in sport
  • Drugs in sport
  • Violence in sport
  • Characteristics of skilful movement
  • Goal setting
  • Health, fitness and well-being
  • Diet and nutrition

3) Performance in Physical Education

  • Students will be assessed in three sporting activities.
  • At least one of the performances must be in a team activity and at least one must be an individual activity.
  • You cannot be assessed in the same sport twice e.g. Table Tennis as an individual and as a team performance.
  • Students will also complete an ‘Evaluating and Applying Performance’ written task. In this, students will need to evaluate the performance of a sportsperson, identify strengths and weaknesses and explain how they would improve the performance level using a range of different techniques

Assessment

Students will be assessed on each of the 3 sections of the course by:

1) Physical Factors Affecting Performance Exam

  • 60 marks
  • 1 hour
  • 30% of overall GCSE grade

2) Socio-cultural Issues and Sport Psychology Exam

  • 60 marks
  • 1 hour
  • 30% of overall GCSE grade

3) Performance in Physical Education

  • 80 marks
  • 40% of overall GCSE grade
    • 3 sports - 10% each (1 individual, 1 team, 1 either)
    • 1 x AEP - 10 %
  • The practical assessment of 3 sports takes place throughout the course, with the final assessment in February/March of year 11.
  • Students may then be selected to attend the external practical moderation after March 31st.
  • Students will need to provide evidence of all the matches/competitions they have competed in throughout the course for each sport (both in and out of school).
  • Students being assessed in the following sports will also need to provide video evidence of key skills, and their performances in competitions.
    • boxing, equestrian, kayaking, rock climbing, swimming, skiing/snowboarding
  • Students will also complete an EAP through the summer of year 10, into year 11 where they will have 14 hours in class to assess the fitness and skill requirements of a chosen sport, evaluate their own / a partners’ performance in that sport and create a training programme to improve a chosen skill. These will be externally assessed by the practical moderator from 31st March in year 11

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework and include activities such as:

  • Create a poster to show the structure and function of a body system
  • Complete a quiz on show my homework to check understanding of a topic
  • Answer exam questions on a topic
  • Research a specific topic, such as the effects of exercise on the cardiovascular system
  • Create a presentation to deliver in class on a topic such as the characteristics of a skill

As well as completing the weekly homework tasks, students should be reading through their class notes after each lesson to check what they understood, so they can ask their teacher questions or for more help if needed, as well as to help them store the information learnt in their long term memory.

To help them with revision for the exams, students should create revision resources for each topic as they are learning them, rather than leave it all to the end, as this will save them time in year 11, and also help store the information in their long term memory as they will be recalling it more regularly.


Where can Physical Education take you

Further Study

  • A level PE
  • BTEC Sport level 3
  • Degrees in Sport Science, Sports Coaching, Sports Journalism, Physiotherapy, Parks, Recreation and Leisure Studies, Business Administration and Management

Careers

  • PE teacher
  • Physiotherapist
  • Professional Sports person
  • Sports Coach
  • Sports policy developer
  • Fitness instructor / Personal trainer
  • Nutritionist

How parents can support their child's learning

  • Ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  •  Get your child to teach you something they learnt today, see if they can help you remember it, as this will help ensure they understand it and consolidate their own learning.
  •  Get your child to regularly create revision posters / flash cards to help recap information
  • Use your child’s workbooks / revision posters / flash cards to ask them questions and test their knowledge / help them to revise it regularly e.g. on a car journey, whilst making/eating dinner.
  •  Encourage your child to take part in sports clubs in and out of school and support them with it
  •  Watch sports matches / events with your child, and ask them questions that would relate to GCSE PE theory, such as; which muscles are the athletes using in that skill?; which components of fitness are important for that athlete?; what kind of training would you need to do to improve your fitness and skills for that sport?; What are (athlete’s names) strengths and weaknesses in their performance.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss C.Pennifold, Head of Physical Education, Townsend Church of England School

Religious Studies

Course Details

GCSE Religious Studies A (9-1) AQA 8062


Course Description

This course offers a variety of relevant and contemporary themes, ensuring students have a diverse choice of intriguing subjects to explore and discuss from a Christian, Muslim and non-religious worldview perspective.

Students will learn how religion, philosophy and ethics form the basis of our culture, and develop valuable skills that will help prepare them for further study.


Programme of Study

Year 9

In Year 9 students begin by exploring a variety of Philosophical and Ethical issues and develop the skill of thinking deeply and critically which is essential for GCSE. They then learn about Prejudice and Discrimination with a focus on the Holocaust as an example of extreme discrimination and contemplate ideas around justice. In the Spring term, the pupils begin a final un-examined unit of the GCSE course which is Peace and Conflict which deals with issues such as war, protests and peace before starting the first examined unit for component 1.

Year 10

Component 1: The study of Religions: Beliefs, Teachings and Practices

  • Christianity
  • Islam

Year 11

Component 2: Thematic Studies

  • Theme A: Relationships and families.
  • Theme B: Religion and life.
  • Theme E: Religion, crime and punishment.
  • Theme F: Religion, human rights and social justice.

Assessment

Paper 1 - Component 1: The Study of Religions; beliefs, teachings and practices

  • 96 marks, plus 6 marks for SPaG
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE
  • Each religion has a common structure of two five-part questions of 1, 2, 4, 5 and 12 marks.
  • Each religion is marked out of 48.

Paper 2 - Component 2: Thematic Studies

  • 96 marks, plus 3 marks for SPaG
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE
  • Each theme has a common structure of one five-part question of 1, 2, 4, 5 and 12 marks.
  • Each theme is marked out of 24.

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework and include activities such as:

  • online quizzes,
  • exam question practice,
  • research on specific topics,
  • prepare a presentation,
  • watching relevant documentaries,
  • wider reading.

Where can Religious Studies take you

Knowledge of other cultures and world religious beliefs can be useful in many jobs where you are working with the public or communities.

Further Study

  • A Level Religious Studies

Careers

  • Counselling
  • Social Services
  • Marketing
  • Sales and Advertising
  • Catering and Hospitality
  • Leisure, Sport and Tourism
  • Retail Sales and Customer Services
  • Education and Training
  • Medicine and Nursing
  • Service Sector Roles

My Future My Career My RE http://casestudies.reonline.org.uk


How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ask students about what they are currently learning about.
  • Get your child to teach you something they have been taught.
  • Quiz your child on their learning.
  • Ask questions about any moral or ethical issues that might come up on the news e.g. The Environment, Animal Testing, Crime, Human Rights, etc.
  • Challenge their views and let them clearly justify with reasons and evidence their beliefs.
  • Play devils advocate when discussing certain topics to get them to consider a range of perspectives.
  • Provide a quiet environment or space for them to revise, make flash cards, posters, etc.
  • Time your child’s exam question practice.

Support them in creating a revision timetable


Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Ms A.Sheppard, Head of Religious Studies and Worship, Townsend Church of England School

Science - Combined Science

Course Details

GCSE Combined Sciences, OCR 21st Century


Course Description

Our GCSE Combined Science introduces students to key concepts in biology, chemistry and physics in interesting settings to help anchor their knowledge and understanding. They develop practical skills and theoretical understanding of how scientific ideas can describe complex natural phenomena.


Programme of Study

  • The Combined Science course emphasises scientific literacy – the knowledge and understanding which candidates need to engage, as informed citizens, with science-based issues.
  • This qualification uses contemporary, relevant contexts of interest to candidates, which can be approached through a range of teaching and learning activities.
  • course comprises eighteen teaching units which are assessed through a combination of examinations at the end of year 11 (worth a total of 100% of the final grade).
  • The course is worth two GCSE’s.
  • Throughout the two years of the course the pupils will be completing various set practical’s which will match up with the units they are learning.
  • In their final exam pupils will be expected to remember these practicals and will be examined on the skills learned during this practical.

Units

There are six teaching topics for each of the sciences in both the combined science course and each of the separate sciences, plus one general chapter in ideas about science, and one practical skills chapter:

Biology

  • B1: You and your genes
  • B2: Keeping healthy
  • B3: Living together - food and ecosystems
  • B4: Using food and controlling growth
  • B5: The human body - staying alive
  • B6: Life on Earth - past, present, and future

Chemistry

  • C1: Air and water
  • C2: Chemical patterns
  • C3: Chemicals of the natural environment
  • C4: Material choices
  • C5: Chemical analysis
  • C6: Making useful chemicals

Physics

  • P1: Radiation and waves
  • P2: Sustainable energy
  • P3: Electric circuits
  • P4: Explaining motion
  • P5: Radioactive materials
  • P6: Matter - models and explanations

General Topics

  • BCP7: Ideas about science
  • BCP8: Practical skills

Assessment

In Combined Science each subject (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) will have one exam each plus an additional paper on combined science which will assess their practical skill and ideas about science such as fair testing, data analysis and the development of scientific theories:

Biology

  • 95 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 26.4% of overall GCSE

Chemistry

  • 95 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 26.4% of overall GCSE

Physics

  • 95 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 26.4% of overall GCSE

Combined Science Paper

  • 75 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 20.8% of overall GCSE

Home Learning

Students will be set regular homework which links to their in-class learning and will involve activities such as:

  • Revision
  • Quizzes
  • Exam question practice

Where can Science take you

Science can not only lead you down a broad range of careers and further study but it can lead you into lifelong passions and hobbies. Science is an absolute key player in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) subjects. Whilst people follow science careers because they feel like they have an affinity for science, or an ambition, or just pure interest in the sciences, it is common knowledge that the careers are some of the top paying and most respectable in the world, whether to be an Engineer, a Researcher, or a vital role in the NHS.

Further Study

  • If you want to take further studies in any of the Sciences you should be looking to take the single sciences route to achieve A levels in any of the three disciplines which can extend your career opportunities in the sciences.

Careers

  • Engineer
  • Researcher
  • Medicine
  • Marine Biology
  • Forensic Science
  • Conservation Biology and Ecology
  • Veterinarian Medicine
  • Mechanical Engineering

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can regularly check Show My Homework to check homework and any other notices, and should also be reading the Parentmail sent out each week for any key information.
  • Parents can also encourage their children to be completing extra revision at home and ensuring students are equipped with pens, pencils, rulers and calculators for every science lesson as a minimum.

Useful Links

  • Seneca Learning is a good website to use for revision and filling in any gaps in student knowledge if a student has missed a lesson for example, and can also be an aid in helping to embed anything learned in class. Students need to sign up to this free website themselves and ensure they are joined to the correct courses, their teachers may make “classes” for them to join https://www.senecalearning.com/en-GB/.
  • Students are encouraged to use the excellent GCSEPod website that the school has invested in, using the login details given to them https://www.gcsepod.com/.
  • BBC bitesize is another good website for students to access https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/levels/z98jmp3.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss N. Guijarro, Head of Science, Townsend Church of England School

Science - Single Sciences

Course Details

GCSE Single Sciences, OCR 21st Century


Course Description

  • Our GCSE in Biology introduces students to a range of biological ideas through interesting settings, enabling them to anchor their conceptual knowledge. Through both practical activity and theoretical study students develop their scientific understanding and critical thinking skills.
  • Our GCSE Chemistry qualification uses a narrative-based approach to introduce and anchor conceptual knowledge in interesting settings. Students develop their understanding of chemical concepts and scientific methodology alongside practical and analytical skills.
  • Our GCSE Physics qualification introduces physical topics in relevant and interesting settings, helping students to anchor their conceptual knowledge onto something concrete. Students develop their understanding of scientific theory and methodology alongside appropriate practical skills.

Programme of Study

  • Single sciences is a combination of three GCSEs in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. It provides the fullest coverage of these subjects at Key stage 4.
  • It contains all the elements of combined science but in more depth on certain concepts.
  • Successful completion of the course results in three separate GCSEs being awarded. Separate Science is worth 3 GCSEs and taught in the same number of hours as combined science so therefore lessons are fast paced and a lot of content is covered in each lesson.
  • Due to the more complex and detailed study of the separate sciences teachers will assess pupils ability to achieve in triple science and would advise pupils as to whether this route or combined would be a better option based on an individual’s performance and attitude to learning at KS3.

Units

There are six teaching topics for each of the sciences in both the combined science course and each of the single sciences, plus one general chapter in ideas about science, and one practical skills chapter:

Biology

  • B1: You and your genes
  • B2: Keeping healthy
  • B3: Living together - food and ecosystems
  • B4: Using food and controlling growth
  • B5: The human body - staying alive
  • B6: Life on Earth - past, present, and future

Chemistry

  • C1: Air and water
  • C2: Chemical patterns
  • C3: Chemicals of the natural environment
  • C4: Material choices
  • C5: Chemical analysis
  • C6: Making useful chemicals

Physics

  • P1: Radiation and waves
  • P2: Sustainable energy
  • P3: Electric circuits
  • P4: Explaining motion
  • P5: Radioactive materials
  • P6: Matter - models and explanations

General Topics

  • BCP7: Ideas about science
  • BCP8: Practical skills

Assessment

Breath in Biology (01)

  • 90 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE Biology

Depth in Biology (02)

  • 90 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE Biology

Breadth in Chemistry (01)

  • 90 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE Chemistry

Depth in Chemistry (02)

  • 90 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE Chemistry

Breadth in Physics (01)

  • 90 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE Physics

Depth in Physics (02)

  • 90 marks
  • 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of overall GCSE Physics

Home Learning

Students will be set regular homework which links to their in-class learning and will involve activities such as:

  • Revision
  • Quizzes
  • Exam question practice

Due to the nature and higher content in the separate sciences, students undertaking these courses will be expected to complete more home learning than combined sciences.


Where can Science take you

Science can not only lead you down a broad range of careers and further study but it can lead you into lifelong passions and hobbies. Science is an absolute key player in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) subjects. Whilst people follow science careers because they feel like they have an affinity for science, or an ambition, or just pure interest in the sciences, it is common knowledge that the careers are some of the top paying and most respectable in the world, whether to be an Engineer, a Researcher, or a vital role in the NHS.

If you want to take further studies in any of the Sciences you should be looking to take the single sciences route to achieve A levels in any of the three disciplines which can extend your career opportunities in the sciences.

Further Study

  • A Level Biology
  • A Level Chemistry
  • A Level Physics

Careers

  • Engineer
  • Researcher
  • Medicine
  • Marine Biology
  • Forensic Science
  • Conservation Biology and Ecology
  • Veterinarian Medicine
  • Mechanical Engineering

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can regularly check Show My Homework to check homework and any other notices, and should also be reading the Parentmail sent out each week for any key information.
  • Parents can also encourage their children to be completing extra revision at home and ensuring students are equipped with pens, pencils, rulers and calculators for every science lesson as a minimum.

Useful Links

  • Seneca Learning is a good website to use for revision and filling in any gaps in student knowledge if a student has missed a lesson for example, and can also be an aid in helping to embed anything learned in class. Students need to sign up to this free website themselves and ensure they are joined to the correct courses, their teachers may make “classes” for them to join https://www.senecalearning.com/en-GB/.
  • Students are encouraged to use the excellent GCSEPod website that the school has invested in, using the login details given to them https://www.gcsepod.com/.
  • BBC bitesize is another good website for students to access https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/levels/z98jmp3.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss N. Guijarro, Head of Science, Townsend Church of England School