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Subjects

Students are required to have an APS of a minimum of 4.5 to attend Townsend Sixth Form to study 3 A Levels, with specific course requirements in the PDF below.

Students who do not achieve a grade 4 or above in Mathematics or English will be expected to attend extra classes and retake their exams to achieve a grade 4 or above during their studies.

 

Business

Course Details

AQA Business A Level (7132)

Course Description

  • The Business A Level course examines how a business operates, and considers the key functional areas of a business including Marketing, Finance, Operations and Human Resources. The external environment and competitive market that businesses operate within is also a key focus. Students will develop a critical understanding of business organisations and business activity, developing the analytical and evaluative skills needed to give strategic advice to firms of all sizes, in a variety of potential business scenarios.
  • The qualification will appeal to students who have a general interest in business and current affairs or who may wish to pursue a career in the business and enterprise sector in the future. Although the NCFE Business and Enterprise course or GCSE Business will offer an ideal foundation to study Business at A Level, it is not essential that students have previously studied Business at Key Stage 4.
  • Students have nine one-hour Business lessons over a two week timetable. Lessons are classroom based and utilise a wide range of resources in addition to independent study and research. A range of methods will be used to develop the skills of analysis, decision making and evaluation. The emphasis is on learning through case study material that reflects issues faced by firms and case studies are often based on real life firms.  Unit tests and past papers are used to coach students in exam technique and progress is assessed regularly throughout the course.
  • Students are encouraged to take part in additional activities to support curriculum learning, including national Business and Economics competitions and mentoring younger students studying the Business and Enterprise course in Years 9-11.

Programme of Study

Students will learn why businesses exist and the reasons for choosing and changing business structure. The four key functional areas in business: finance, human resources, operations and marketing are studied in detail. Students will learn how decisions are made regarding these core functions and develop the skills to discuss the impact on the firm of various decisions. Financial planning is a significant part of the course and students will carry out calculations using a range of financial documents in order to interpret and analyse a business’s position. Students will learn to assess risk and the potential impacts of long term strategic decision making using different business models and theorists. Managing strategic change includes an international perspective as well as economic, technological, political and legal aspects.

The Syllabus

The syllabus for the course can be viewed using the links below. Sections 1-6 are studied in Year 12 and sections 7-10 in Year 13.

Assessment

Final assessment is through external exams and consists of three papers. All three papers will be examined in the May/June of the second year. Each paper lasts 2 hours, is 100 marks, and is worth 33.3% of the A Level marks. All papers are synoptic and cover all syllabus content.

Paper 1

  • Section A – 15 multiple choice questions
  • Section B – Short answer questions – generally between 2 and 9 marks
  • Section C + D – Essay questions (choice of two from four) – 25 marks each

Paper 2

  • Based on three compulsory case studies which include data response and calculation questions in addition to longer written essay questions.
  • Generally questions will range from between 2 and 20 marks

Paper 3

  • One compulsory case study (unseen) consisting of approximately 6 questions ranging from 12 to 24 marks.

Past Papers

Specimen and past papers can be found using the link below.
  • https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/business-subjects/as-and-a-level/business-7131-7132/assessment-resources

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework or Google Classroom and include activities such as:
  • flipped learning – reading and activities to prepare in advance for lessons
  • completing a quiz to check understanding of a topic
  •  answer exam questions on a topic
  •  research a specific topic, such as the interests of different stakeholders
  •  create a presentation to deliver in class on a specific topic, such as the sources of finance available to a business
  •  revise/create revision materials on certain topics
As well as completing the weekly homework tasks, students should be reading through their class notes after each lesson to check understanding and prepare questions to ask the teacher where additional help is needed. To help with revision for the exam it is recommended that students prepare revision resources for topics as they are learning them.
  • Students should be prepared to study independently and use all the resources available to them both in and out of the classroom. This includes a commitment to wider reading/study, including keeping up to date with current business news through newspapers and journals, in addition to watching the news and other relevant business programs.

Where can Business take you

Further Study

  • Apprenticeship in Business, Economics or Accounting
  • Degrees in Business, Economics, Management, Administration, Finance, Accounting,   Marketing, Human Resources, Hospitality and Leisure and Tourism
  • Professional Business and Finance qualifications such as, AAT, CIMA, ACCA, ACA, MBA

   Careers

  •  Entrepreneur
  •  Accountant
  •  Management Consultant
  •  Actuary
  •  Business Teacher
  •  HR Manager
  •  Marketing
  •  Human Resource Manager
  •  Banking
  •  Stockbroker
  •  Logistics and Supply Chains

How can parents support their child's learning

  • ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  • discuss current business and economic events to engage your child in wider learning and reading
  • review work set on SMHW and Google Classroom
  • use your child’s work / revision resources / flash cards to ask them questions and test their knowledge, regular repetition will consolidate learning and practice key skills
  • encourage your child to attend consolidation and revision sessions
  • ensure your child is completing enough work outside the classroom to thrive at A Level
  • (an average of 4-5 hours per week, per A Level subject in addition to class time is   recommended)

Useful Links


For More Information, Contact:

Miss A. Philpott, Townsend Church of England School
English Literature

Course Details

A Level English Literature 7717

Course Description

This interesting and exciting course provides the opportunity for students to explore challenging, and at times controversial, texts which no matter when written still hold great relevance and power today. In Year 12, students study set texts through the lense of tragedy, and in Year 13 students study political and social protest writing.
  • It is vital that students have a love of literature for success at this level and that they are prepared to independently research the subject beyond the classroom.
  • Students are taught by two different members of the English team for 9 hours per fortnight in Year 12 and Year 13.
  • If a production of a play is being shown in London, we aim to take the students to see the production to really experience the staging and production in all its glory.

Programme of Study

Year 12

  • The chosen set texts in Year 12 foster discussion and debate and open students’ eyes to different styles of writing. The texts are; ‘Death of A Salesman, ‘Othello’ and Keats’ poetry. Whilst in Year 12 students undertake their NEA assessment, consisting of two pieces of writing based on texts of their choice.

Year 13

  • In Year 13 the texts encourage students to become more aware of alternative societies and the writers’ viewpoints of these. The texts are; ‘The Kite Runner’, ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ and the poetry of William Blake.  

Assessment

A level assessment consists of a mixture of NEA (non-exam assessment) and final examinations.

Examinations

Paper 1A. - Aspects of tragedy.
  • 75 marks
  • 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 40% of overall A Level
Paper 2B. - Elements of political and social Protest writing
  • 75 marks
  • 3 hours
  • 40% of overall A Level

Non-Exam Assessment

  • Two essays based on a literary theory.
  • One essay must be on a prose text and one must be on poetry.
  • These pieces are independent pieces of work.
  • 50 marks
  • Approximately 1500 words each
  • 20% of overall A Level

Home Learning

Students will be set tasks to complete in various forms ranging from reading around literary theories, researching Tragedy as a genre, contextual information about the texts themselves and formal essays. Reading beyond the subject is vital for success at this level. Show My Homework is still used as a platform to upload tasks.

Where can English take you

Further Study

  • Degree in English
  • Degree in Law
  • Degree in History
  • Degree in Journalism

Careers

  • A degree in English lends itself so well to further study such as a Masters Degree and Doctorate Degree.
  • Journalism
  • Teacher
  • Writer
  • Critic
  • Editor
  • University Lecturer
  • Researcher
  • Public Relations Officer
  • Newscaster
  • Broadcaster
  • Web content Manager
  • Newspaper/Magazine Editor
  • Librarian

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Engage in a discussion with your child about the texts they are studying in class and the themes these texts explore.
  • If possible, look out for theatre productions/live screenings of the plays being studied or any plays that may be of interest to your child more broadly.
  • Encourage your child to read broadly and to choose texts that challenge them and supplement the set texts they are studying.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs P.Harris, Head of English, Townsend Church of England School
Health and Social Care

Course Details

BTEC Level 3 Nationals Health and Social Care Extended Diploma and Diploma

Course Description

The BTEC Health and Social Care course requires students to study a range of Units which include developing  their knowledge and understanding of how the human body changes over life span, skills and behaviours required for working in the health and social care sector, principles of safe practice and the importance of respecting individual differences and meeting the needs of service users ,as well as anatomy and physiology and exploring current research into health  using both classroom study and includes a work experience placement for extended diploma.

Diploma

  • Equivalent to 2 A Levels (720 GLH)
  • 8 units – 6 Mandatory, 3 of which are externally assessed through exams or supervised research projects. 2 optional units

Extended Diploma

  • Equivalent to 3 A Levels (1080 GLH)
  • 13 Units – 8 Mandatory Units, 4 of which are externally assessed through exams or supervised research projects. 5 optional units

Programme of Study

The course Units are delivered over a two-year programme

Diploma

Mandatory Units
  • 1 – Human Lifespan Development – external exam
  • 2 – Working in Health and Social Care – external exam
  • 4 – Enquiries into Research in Health & Social Care - externally assessed supervised research project
  • 5 – Meeting Individual Care and Support Needs – Internally assessed coursework
  • 7 – Principles of Safe Practice in Health and Social care – Internally assessed coursework
  • 8 – Promoting Public Health - Internally assessed coursework
Optional Units - choose 2 internally assessed units from:
  • 6 – Work Experience in Health and Social Care
  • 10 – Sociological Perspectives
  • 11 – Psychological Perspectives
  • 12 – Supporting Individuals with Additional Needs
  • 19 – Nutritional Health

Extended Diploma

Mandatory Units - all the mandatory units listed in the Diploma, as well as:
  •  3 – Anatomy and physiology for health and social care – external exam
  • 6 – Work Experience in Health and Social Care - Internally assessed coursework
Optional Units - 5 internally assessed units from: Choose 2-3 from:
  • 11 – Psychological Perspectives
  • 19 – Nutritional Health
  • 20 – Understanding Mental Well-being
Choose 2-3 from:
  • 10 – Sociological Perspectives
  • 12 – Supporting Individuals with Additional Needs
  • 18 – Assessing Children’s development support needs

Assessment

Externally Assessed Exams (2 resit options available for exams) Unit 1 - 90glh
  • 1.5 hour exam
  • 90 marks
  • taken in January of year 12
Unit 2 - 120glh
  • 1.5 hour exam
  • 80 marks
  • taken in May/June of year 12
Unit 3 - 120glh
  • 1.5 hour exam
  • 90 marks
  • taken in January of year 13
Unit 4 - 120glh
  • Students will be provided with a research article (Part A) 4 weeks prior to the supervised assessment period in order to carry out secondary research
  • Students should compile notes on their secondary research in monitored sessions of 6 hours, scheduled by the school
  • The supervised assessment period (Part B) is undertaken in a single morning session of 3 hours
  • 65 marks
  • taken in May/June of year 13

Internally Assessed Coursework Units

These coursework units are delivered across the two year course, with specific deadlines for tasks given to students at the start of each unit. Students must hand in their tasks by the deadline date, and will be given 1 chance on each unit to improve their grade within a week of feedback being provided. Students are assessed against grading criteria to achieve a Pass, Merit or Distinction Standard. Each unit will be awarded different marks for achieving a Pass, Merit or Distinction based on their guided learning hours (glh), and the content required to complete the unit assessment.
  • Unit 5 - 90 glh
  • Unit 6 - 60 glh
  • Unit 7 - 90 glh
  • Unit 8 - 90 glh
  • Unit 10 - 60 glh
  • Unit 11 - 60glh
  • Unit 12 - 60glh
  • Unit 18 - 60glh
  • Unit 19 - 60glh
  • Unit 20 - 60glh

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework and include activities such as:
  • Watch a T.V programme or film or read an article on health or social care issue and write notes to feedback to class
  • Complete a quiz on show my homework to check understanding of a topic
  • Answer exam questions on a topic
  • Research a specific topic, such as legislation related to health and social care
  • Create a presentation to deliver in class on a topic such as the impact of ageing on intellectual development or development of fine motor skills during early childhood
  • As well as completing the weekly homework tasks, students should be reading through their class notes after each lesson to check what they understood, so they can ask their teacher questions or for more help if needed, as well as to help them store the information learnt in their long term memory.
  • To help them with revision for the exams, students should create revision resources for each topic as they are learning them, rather than leave it all to the end, as this will save them time when revising and also help store the information in their long term memory as they will be recalling it more regularly.

Where can Health and Social Care take you

The Health and Social Care courses help develop many employability skills, including:
  • cognitive and problem-solving skills - critical thinking, approach non-routine problems applying expert and creative solutions, use systems and technology
  • intrapersonal skills - communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation
  • interpersonal skills - self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development
The Health and Social Care courses provide transferable knowledge and skills that prepare learners for progression to university:
  • the ability to learn independently
  • the ability to research actively and methodically
  • to be able to give presentations and be active group members.
  • effective writing
  • analytical skills
  • preparation for assessment methods used in degrees.

Further Study

  • BSc (Hons) in Nursing or Midwifery
  • BA (Hons) in Social Work
  • BSc (Hons) in Physiotherapy
  • BSc (Hons) in Psychology
  • BSc (Hons) in Occupational Therapy
  • BSc (Hons) in Speech Therapy
  • BA (Hons) in Health and Social Care

Careers

  • Radiography
  • Midwifery and Nursing
  • Paramedic Science
  • Podiatry
  • Healthcare Science
  • NHS Practitioner Training Programme
  • Special Educational Needs Teacher
  • Social Worker
  • Care Worker
  • Primary School Teacher

How can parents support their child's learning

  • encourage your child to take part in a range of different social interactions or voluntary work to gain as much experience and people skills as possible
  • watch a film or TV programme together, discuss the health or social issues it raises, explore how health professionals are portrayed, discuss how needs of individuals are met or not met in those situations and the ethical implications for them
  • provide a suitable learning environment for independent study, proof read written assignments to support ongoing literacy skills
  • support independent study as this is critical to ensure coursework is completed on time, revision is done for exams and homework tasks completed
  •  ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  •  get your child to explain or describe an aspect of what they learnt today, see if they can help you remember it, as this will help ensure they understand it and consolidate their own learning and be able to explain it in their own words.
  •  get your child to regularly create revision posters / flash cards to help recap information
  •  use your child’s workbooks / revision posters / flash cards to ask them questions and test their knowledge / help them to revise it regularly e.g. on a car journey, whilst making/eating dinner.

Useful Links


For More Information, Contact:

Miss C.Pennifold, Townsend Church of England School
History

Course Details

A Level History - Edexcel

Course Description

The subjects chosen have been designed to give a breadth of knowledge across a range of periods, to develop the necessary skills and understanding which will be needed by students planning to progress to undergraduate study at a UK higher education establishment, particularly (although not only) in the same subject area.

Programme of Study

Year 12

  • Paper 1: Britain transformed 1918-1997
  • Paper 2: The conformity and challenge in the USA 1955-92

Year 13

  • Paper 3: Poverty, public health and the state in Britain c1780-1939
  • Coursework: Historical interpretations of a controvers

Assessment

All three papers will be sat at the end of the two-year course. In addition to class assessment there will be one threshold exam at the end of Year 12, and mock exams in the November and March of Year 13. In class assessment will occur throughout the year. Coursework will be completed in Year 13 prior to exams.

Route H: Democracies in change: Britain and the USA in the twentieth century

Paper 1 - Britain transformed 1918-1997.
  • 60 marks
  • 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 30% of overall A Level
  • Students answer 3 questions: 1 from section A, 1 from section B and 1 from section C
Paper 2 - The conformity and challenge in the USA 1955-92
  • 40 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 20% of overall A Level
  • Students answer 2 questions: 1 from section A and 1 from section B
Paper 3 - Poverty, public health and the state in Britain c1780-1939
  • 60 marks
  • 2 hours 15 miuntes
  • 30% of overall A Level
  • Students answer 3 questions: 1 from section A, 1 from section B, 1 from section C
Coursework - Historical interpretations of a controversy (student choice)
  • 40 marks
  • 3000-4000 words
  • 20% of overall A Level
  • Controlled assessment
  • Students complete a single assignment on a question set by the centre

Home Learning

Home learning will take the form of preparation or review of work in class. This consists largely of reading or tasks given by the teacher.
  • Reading around the subject is essential for greater understanding, the textbook is a starting point, but students are expected to use the reading list to further their understanding

Where can History take you

The skills acquired through the study of History, at any level, are invaluable for an array of career paths. Those listed below show just a few which have a direct and indirect relation to the subject.

Further Study

  • Degrees in
    • History
    • Art History
    • Ancient History
    • Military History
    • European History
    • American History
    • Politics
    • International Relations
    • Gender Studies
    • Sociology

Careers

Careers related directly to History:
  • Heritage manager
  • Historic buildings inspector or conservation officer
  • Museum education officer
  • Museum or gallery curator
  • Museum or gallery exhibitions officer
  • Teaching
Careers where the qualification would be useful:
  • Editorial assistant
  • Information officer
  • Politician’s assistant
  • Law
  • Management consultancies
  • Publishing companies
  • Television and radio broadcasters.

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can discuss with the students how they plan to manage their time for the home learning tasks and revision for assessments.
  • We strongly encourage students to gain background research from books rather than the internet as it is often age-inappropriate for students and the school’s Discovery Centre, local libraries and books at home would all be helpful to students deepening their knowledge and understand of the topics studied.
  • Visiting historical sites and encouraging discussion about the topics studied in class is also useful.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Mrs J. Bailey, Head of History, Townsend Church of England School
Mathematics

Course Details

At Key Stage 5 we offer both A Level Mathematics and A Level Further Mathematics and students follow the Edexcel Syllabus.

Course Description  

  • Students studying A Level Mathematics cover Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics topics of Statistics and Mechanics.
  • The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Mathematics consists of three externally-examined papers.
  • Students will complete all assessment in May/June in year 13.

Programme of Study

Pure Mathematics

  • Proof
  • Algebra and Functions
  • Coordinate Geometry in the (x,y) plane
  • Sequences and Series
  • Trigonometry
  • Exponentials and Logarithms
  • Differentiation
  • Integration
  • Numerical Methods
  • Vectors

Statistics

  • Statistical Sampling
  • Data Presentation and interpretation
  • Probability
  • Statistical Distributions
  • Statistical Hypothesis Testing

Mechanics

  • Quantities and Units in Mechanics
  • Kinematics
  • Forces and Newton's Laws
  • Moments

Assessment

  • Paper 1 and Paper 2 may contain questions on any topics from the Pure Mathematics content.
  • Paper 3 will contain questions on topics from the Statistics content in Section A and Mechanics content in Section B.
  • Students must answer all questions.
  • Calculators can be used in the assessment.

Paper 1 - Pure Mathematics 1 (9MAO/01)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 33.33% of overall qualification

Paper 2 - Pure Mathematics 2 (9MAO/02)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 33.33% of overall qualification

Paper 3 - Statistics and Mechanics (9MAO/o3)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 33.33% of overall qualification

Home Learning

The Mathematics Department subscribes to the Integral website and tasks will be set on this platform in addition to other tasks set by class teachers.

Where can Mathematics take you

Maths is one of the most respected subjects to achieve a qualification in, and the breadth of applications is immense. Mathematics underpins most of science, technology and engineering and is also important in areas as diverse as business, law, nutrition, sports science and psychology. There are many opportunities to use Maths to make a difference in society, for example through the analysis involved in medical research, developing new technology, modelling epidemics or in the study of patterns of criminal activity to identify trends. Studying Mathematics develops problem solving and logic skills, but also provides opportunities to develop team-working skills, resilience, effective communication and the ability to use your own initiative.

Further Study

  • Degrees in
    • Mathematics
    • Accounting
    • Economics
    • Biology
    • Engineering
    • Business and Management
    • Politics
    • Statistics

Careers

  • Finance- Actuarial Work, Accountancy, Financial Modelling, Investment Banking
  • Computing- Games Design, Internet Security,  Telecommunications
  • Mathematical Biology- Population Modelling, Epidemics and Vaccination
  • Engineering- Aircraft Modelling, Fluid Flows, Acoustic Engineering, Quantity Surveyor, Planner
  • Teaching and Lecturing
  • Statistics- Medical Statistics, Market Research, Government Statistics
  • Business- Logistics, Traffic Planning, Project Management, Business Consultancy

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ensure that your child uses the internet learning tutorials effectively, possibly sitting with them and learning the Mathematics skills together.
  • Always try to take opportunities to use Mathematics and problem solving in real life contexts with your child: best buys at the supermarket; exchange rates for currency; conversion of measurements; utility bills; interest repayments on loans, mortgages or interest on investments; percentage increase/decrease; card/dice/board games; code-breaking etc.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Head of Mathematics, Townsend Church of England School
Mathematics - Further Maths

Course Details

At Key Stage 5 we offer both A Level Mathematics and A Level Further Mathematics and students follow the Edexcel Syllabus.

Course Description  

  • This Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Further Mathematics builds on the skills, knowledge and understanding set out in the whole GCSE subject content for mathematics and the subject content for the Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced GCE Mathematics qualifications. Assessments will be designed to reward students for demonstrating the ability to provide responses that draw together different areas of their knowledge, skills and understanding from across the full course of study for the AS further mathematics qualification and also from across the AS Mathematics qualification. Problem solving, proof and mathematical modelling will be assessed in further mathematics in the context of the wider knowledge which students taking A level further mathematics will have studied.
  • The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Further Mathematics consists of four externally-examined papers.
  • Students must complete all assessments in May/June in year 13.

Programme of Study

Pure Mathematics

  • Proof
  • Complex Numbers
  • Matrices
  • Further Algebra and Functions
  • Further Calculus
  • Further Vectors
  • Polar Coordinates
  • Hyperbolic Functions
  • Differential Equations

Further Mathematics Option 1

Students take one of the following four options:
  • A: further Pure Mathematics 1
  • B: Further Statistics 1
  • C: Further Mechanics 1
  • D: Decision Mathematics 1

Further Mathematics Option 2

Students take one of the following seven options:
  • A: Further Pure Mathematics 2
  • B: Further Statistics 1
  • C: Further Mechanics 1
  • D: Decision Mathematics 1
  • E: Further Statistics 2
  • F: Further Mechanics 2
  • G: Decision Mathematics 2

Assessment

  • Paper 1 and Paper 2 may contain questions on any topics from the Pure Mathematics content.
  • Students must answer all questions.
  • Paper 3 and Paper 4, students answer all the questions for the topic they opted for.
  • Calculators can be used in the assessment.

Paper 1: Core Pure Mathematics 1 (9FMO/01)

  • 75 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 25% of overall A Level

Paper 2: Core Pure Mathematics 2 (9FMO/02)

  • 75 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 25% of overall A Level

Paper 3: Further Mathematics Option 1 (9FMO/3A-3D)

  • 75 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 25% of overall A Level

Paper 4: Further Mathematics Option 2 (9FMO/4A-4G)

  • 75 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 25% of overall A Level

Home Learning

The Mathematics Department subscribes to the Integral website and tasks will be set on this platform in addition to other tasks set by class teachers.

Where can Mathematics take you

Maths is one of the most respected subjects to achieve a qualification in, and the breadth of applications is immense. Mathematics underpins most of science, technology and engineering and is also important in areas as diverse as business, law, nutrition, sports science and psychology. There are many opportunities to use Maths to make a difference in society, for example through the analysis involved in medical research, developing new technology, modelling epidemics or in the study of patterns of criminal activity to identify trends. Studying Mathematics develops problem solving and logic skills, but also provides opportunities to develop team-working skills, resilience, effective communication and the ability to use your own initiative.

Further Study

  • Degrees in
    • Mathematics
    • Accounting
    • Economics
    • Biology
    • Engineering
    • Business and Management
    • Politics
    • Statistics

Careers

  • Finance- Actuarial Work, Accountancy, Financial Modelling, Investment Banking
  • Computing- Games Design, Internet Security,  Telecommunications
  • Mathematical Biology- Population Modelling, Epidemics and Vaccination
  • Engineering- Aircraft Modelling, Fluid Flows, Acoustic Engineering, Quantity Surveyor, Planner
  • Teaching and Lecturing
  • Statistics- Medical Statistics, Market Research, Government Statistics
  • Business- Logistics, Traffic Planning, Project Management, Business Consultancy

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ensure that your child uses the internet learning tutorials effectively, possibly sitting with them and learning the Mathematics skills together.
  • Always try to take opportunities to use Mathematics and problem solving in real life contexts with your child: best buys at the supermarket; exchange rates for currency; conversion of measurements; utility bills; interest repayments on loans, mortgages or interest on investments; percentage increase/decrease; card/dice/board games; code-breaking etc.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Head of Mathematics, Townsend Church of England School
Media Studies

Course Details

A Level Media Studies, Eduqas

Course Description

  • The media play a central role in contemporary culture, society and politics. They shape our perceptions of the world through the representations, ideas and points of view they offer. The media have real relevance and importance in our lives today, providing us with ways to communicate, with forms of cultural expression and the ability to participate in key aspects of society. The economic importance of the media is also unquestionable. The media industries employ large numbers of people worldwide and generate significant global profit. The globalised nature of the contemporary media, ongoing technological developments and more opportunities to interact with the media suggest their centrality in contemporary life can only increase.
  • The Eduqas specification offers learners the opportunity to develop a thorough and in depth understanding of these key issues, using a comprehensive theoretical framework and a variety of advanced theoretical approaches and theories to support critical exploration and reflection, analysis and debate. The study of a wide range of rich and stimulating media products is central to the specification, offering opportunities for detailed analysis of how the media communicate meanings in a variety of forms.

Programme of Study

Component 1 - Media Products, Industries and Audiences - 35%

In this component, learners will develop knowledge and understanding of key aspects of the theoretical framework - media language and representation – as an essential basis for analysing media products from a variety of forms. In addition, learners will study products from specific media industries and for specific audiences to develop their knowledge and understanding of those areas of the theoretical framework. Learners will also explore how media products relate to their  social, cultural, historical, political and economic contexts. In this  component, learners

Component 2 - Media Forms and Products in Depth - 35%

In this component learners are required to study three media forms in depth, exploring all areas of the theoretical framework - media language, representation, media industries, and audiences - in relation to audio-visual, print and online products set by WJEC. The forms to be studied in depth are: television, magazines, blogs and websites.

Component 3 - Cross-Media Production - 30%

This component synthesises knowledge and understanding of the media theoretical framework gained throughout their course by requiring learners to apply their knowledge and understanding of the media synoptically to practical production. In Components 1 and 2, learners gain a detailed understanding of the theoretical framework in relation to a range of media forms. In this component, learners are required to apply their knowledge and understanding of media language, representation, audiences, media industries and the digitally convergent nature of the media in an individual production for an intended audience. The production must be based on two media forms and completed in response to a choice of briefs set by the exam board.

Assessment

Component 1 - Media Products, Industries and Audiences

  • Written examination – 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 35% of qualification
  • 90 marks

Component 2 - Media Forms and Products in Depth

  • Written examination: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 35% of qualification
  • 90 marks

Component 3 - Cross-Media Production

  • Non-exam assessment: internally assessed and externally moderated by the exam board.
  • 30% of qualification
  • 60 marks

Home Learning

  • In 6th form you will be set weekly tasks to complete for the following weeks lessons.
  • We also expect students to be self-starters and independent learners and read around the subject regularly.
  • If you have ‘spare time’, make sure that it is not wasted.
  • If you have completed work set by the teacher do some extra work.
  • You could research the next topic to be studied or start writing media revision notes.

Where can Media take you

Further Study

  • Degrees / Courses in:
    • Performing arts
    • Broadcast
    • Publishing
    • Journalism
    • Advertising and marketing
    • Film Studies
    • Media Management
    • Television Studies

Careers

This course allows students to gain an insight into all types of information and the ways in which we receive it, this is a valuable skill and would be beneficial in a number of jobs including:
  • Advertising
  • Broadcasting
  • Social networking
  • Design
  • Film production
  • ICT, journalism
  • Music
  • Publishing
  • Sales

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Encourage your child to question what they see or hear in the media.
  • Encourage your child to stay up to date with what is in the news.
  • Encourage your child to explore a range of media products including newspapers and radio.
  • Take an interest in your child’s learning when completing work at home.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss E. Scott, Townsend Church of England School
Physical Education

Course Details

A Level Physical Education - OCR – H555

Course Description

  • The A Level PE course requires students to develop their knowledge and understanding of the physiological and psychological factors affecting performance and the socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport, both through classroom study and through practical performance.
  • Students will have 5 hours of A Level PE lessons, each week in the classroom, delivered as a mix of single and double lessons. Students will be expected to complete 4-5 hour of independent study per week, including homework tasks, extra reading and revision/exam preparation. The lessons will be split between the different sections of the course. In year 1 you will study anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, skill acquisition and sport psychology. In year 2 you will study exercise physiology, socio-cultural and contemporary issues and complete the performance in physical education non-exam assessments.
  • It is imperative that students are taking part in either a sport competitively, including taking part in regular competitions/events, or they are regularly involved in coaching a team in a sport.
  • It will benefit students if they have strong knowledge from GCSE, or are studying Biology, Maths, Physics of Psychology at A Level.

Programme of Study

Students will study each of the 4 sections of the course:  1) Physiological factors affecting performance This section includes applied anatomy and physiology, exercise physiology and biomechanics where students will learn how the body enables you to exercise and how it is affected by exercise. They will also gain a greater understanding on how developments in technology have led to improvements in performance. 2) Psychological factors affecting performance This section includes skill acquisition and sport psychology where students will learn about how we develop skills and how different aspects such as personality and attitude can affect our performance.  3) Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport This section includes sports and society and contemporary issues in physical activity and sport where students will learn about issues that affect participation, development and performance in sport around the World  4) Practical Activity Assessment and Evaluating and Analysing Performance (AEP) This section includes a practical performance assessment in 1 sport as either a performer or coach. Students must be taking part regularly in competitions in their sport outside of school. Students will also have to complete an Evaluation and Analysis of Performance for Improvement (EAPI), where students will watch a live performance, analyse the strengths and weaknesses and justify a suggested action plan to improve one aspect of their performance.

Assessment

1) Physiological factors affecting performance
  • 90 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 30% of the overall A Level grade
2) Psychological factors affecting performance
  • 60 marks
  • 1 hour
  • 20% of the overall A Level grade
 3) Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport
  • 60 marks
  • 1 hour
  • 20% of the overall A Level grade
 4) Practical Activity Assessment and Evaluating and Analysing Performance (AEP)
  • 60 marks
  • 30% of overall grade
  • Students will be assessed through a practical moderation of their performances, this will require a minimum of 3 videos of them in competition, as well as log books detailing all competitions and results they’ve taken part in for their sport throughout year 12 and 13. If they are being assessed as a coach, it will require students to provide 20 detailed plans of 1 hour coaching sessions, a minimum of 3 videoed coaching sessions, as well as evaluations of the 20 sessions they have coached. To be completed by March of year 13, with an external moderation between 31st March-15th May.
  • Students will also be assessed through an oral presentation (30-40minutes) given directly after watching a performance, to evaluate the performance and suggest a 2 month training programme to improve their skills and fitness, relating their analysis to all theoretical aspects of the course. To be completed by March of year 13.

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework and include activities such as:
  •  Extended reading around the subject, using up to date examples and scientific reports.
  •  Research a new topic to gain initial knowledge that will be developed in future lessons
  •  Answer exam questions on a topic
  •  Create presentations on a topic to deliver to the class
As well as completing the weekly homework tasks, students should be reading through their class notes after each lesson to check what they have understood, so they can ask their teacher questions or for more help if needed, as well as to help them store the information learnt in their long term memory. To help them with revision for the exams, students should create revision resources for each topic as they are learning them, rather than leave it all to the end, as this will save them time in year 13, and also help store the information in their long term memory as they will be recalling it more regularly.

Where can PE take you

Further Study

  • Degrees in
    • Sport Science
    • Sports Coaching
    • Sports Journalism
    • Physiotherapy
    • Parks, Recreation and Leisure Studies
    • Business Administration and Management

Careers

  • PE teacher
  • Physiotherapist
  • Professional Sports Person
  • Sports Coach
  • Sports Policy Developer
  • Fitness Instructor / Personal Trainer
  • Nutritionist
  • Sports Journalist

How parents can support their child's learning

  • Ask your child to describe what they learnt in their lesson
  • Get your child to teach you something they learnt today, see if they can help you remember it, as this will help ensure they understand it and consolidate their own learning.
  • Get your child to regularly create revision posters / flash cards to help recap information
  • Use your child’s workbooks / revision posters / flash cards to ask them questions and test their knowledge / help them to revise it regularly e.g. on a car journey, whilst making/eating dinner.
  • Encourage your child to take part in sports clubs in and out of school and support them with it
  • Watch sports matches / events with your child, and ask them questions that would relate to A Level PE theory, such as; which muscles are the athletes using in that skill?; how is your breathing affected by exercise? How can modern technology improve sports for players and spectators? How did sports such as football evolve from pre-industrial revolution activities? How does a footballer make a ball swerve in a free kick?

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss C.Pennifold, Head of Physical Education, Townsend Church of England School
Psychology

Course Details

AQA Psychology A level Specification code: 7181, 7182

Course Description

This A Level Psychology Course will give you an understanding of the way people think and why people behave in certain ways. You will learn a variety of skills including analytical thinking, improved communication, problem solving and many more that will prepare you for an exciting future with the possibility of a range of fantastic careers. Psychology students develop a broad understanding of human behaviour as well as the skills to understand and interpret research findings concerning human behaviour. The psychology curriculum includes courses in cognitive, developmental, behavioural and neural studies, learning, personality, social and clinical psychology. The course emphasises the fundamental concepts and scientific methods of this basic behavioural science discipline.

Programme of Study

This qualification is linear. Linear means that students will sit all their exams at the end of the course.

Year 12

  • Research Methods
  • Social influence
  • Memory
  • Attachment
  • Psychopathology
  • Bio-psychology

Year 13

  • Forensic Psychology
  • Gender
  • Schizophrenia
  • Issues and Debates
  • Research methods
For more information on each subject please visit the website: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/psychology/as-and-a-level/psychology-7181-7182/subject-content-a-level

Assessment

There are 3 papers to sit in year 13 that cover all the learning over the linear course of two years. Throughout the course we write tests after each unit to assess learning as well as completing weekly timed essays and quizzes. The subject content are assessed as follows:

Paper 1 - Introductory Topics in Psychology

  • written exam: 2 hours
  • 96 marks in total
  • 33.3% of A Level

Paper 2 - Psychology in Context

  • written exam: 2 hours
  • 96 marks in total
  • 33.3% of A Level

Paper 3 - Issues and Options in Psychology

  • written exam: 2 hours
  • 96 marks in total
  • 33.3% of A Level

Home Learning

  • Students are expected to complete work booklets on each topic for home learning as well as additional essays within each topic.
  • Students should be reading through their class notes after each lesson to check what they understood, so they can ask their teacher questions or for more help if needed, as well as to help them store the information learnt in their long term memory.
  • To help them with revision for the exams, students should create revision resources for each topic as they are learning them, rather than leave it all to the end, as this will save them time in year 13, and also help store the information in their long term memory as they will be recalling it more regularly.

Where can Psychology take you

Further Study

Psychology A Level can lead onto University degrees in:
  • Sport Psychology
  • Forensic Psychology
  • Neuroscience
  • Bio-psychology
  • Physiotherapy
  • Nursing
  • Social work
  • Child psychology
  • Teaching

Careers

  • Clinical psychologist
  • Counselling psychologist
  • Educational psychologist
  • Forensic psychologist
  • Further education teacher
  • Health psychologist
  • High intensity therapist

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Tasks will be set weekly on Show my homework and via email.
  • Encourage them to read about the topics we study,
  • Discuss their learning with them and engage with the new content they acquire in the classroom.
  • Watch Psychology based movies with your child at home to enjoy the course with them: classics include “One flew over the cookoos nest”, “A beautiful mind” and there is a wealth of documentaries on Youtube to enjoy, many filmed by the BBC on a variety of psychology topics including Memory, Schizophrenia, Social influence, Gender, attachment and forensic psychology.

Useful Links


For More Information, Contact:

Mrs W. Kleynhans, Townsend Church of England School
Religious Studies

Course Details

A Level Religious Studies OCR H573

Course Description

This is a 2 year course provides a coherent and thought-provoking programme of study. Students develop their understanding and appreciation of religious beliefs and teachings, as well as the disciplines of ethics and the philosophy of religion.

Programme of Study

Component 1 - Philosophy of Religion

Students study philosophical language and thought, and issues and questions raised by belief:
  • Ancient philosophical influences
  • the nature of the soul, mind and body
  • Arguments about the existence or non-existence of God
  • The nature and impact of religious experience
  • The challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil
  • Ideas about the nature of God
  • Issues in religious language

Component 2 - Religion and Ethics

Students explore key concepts and the works of influential thinkers, ethical theories and their application:
  • Normative ethical theories
  • The application of ethical theory to two contemporary issues of importance
  • Ethical language and thought
  • Debates surrounding the significant idea of conscience
  • Sexual ethics and the influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs.

Component 3 - Development of Christian Thought

Students explore:
  • Religious beliefs, values and teachings, their interconnections and how they vary historically and in the contemporary world
  • Sources of religious wisdom and authority
  • Practices which shape and express religious identity, and how these vary within a tradition
  • Significant social and historical developments in theology and religious thought
  • Key themes related to the relationship between religion and society.

Assessment

All assessments are written essays which measure knowledge and understanding of religion and belief, including:
  • religious, philosophical and/or ethical thought and teaching
  • influence of beliefs, teachings and practices on individuals, communities and societies
  • cause and significance of similarities and differences in belief, teaching and practice
  • approaches to the study of religion and belief.
  • analysis and evaluation aspects of, and approaches to, religion and belief including their significance, influence and study.

Paper 1 - Philosophy of Religion

  • 120 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 33.3% of overall A Level

Paper 2 - Religion and Ethics

  • 120 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 33.3% of overall A Level

Paper 3 - Development of Christian Thought

  • 120 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 33.3% of overall A Level

Home Learning

Students will be given homework tasks each week to complete, these will be set on Show My Homework and include activities such as:
  • online quizzes,
  • exam question practice,
  • research on specific topics,
  • prepare a presentation,
  • watching relevant documentaries,
  • wider reading, etc.

Where can Religious Studies take you

Knowledge of other cultures and world religious beliefs can be useful in many jobs where you are working with the public or communities.

Further Study

  • A Level Religious Studies

Careers

  • Counselling
  • Social Services
  • Marketing
  • Sales and Advertising
  • Catering and Hospitality
  • Leisure, Sport and Tourism
  • Retail Sales and Customer Services
  • Education and Training
  • Medicine and Nursing
  • Service Sector Roles
My Future My Career My RE - http://casestudies.reonline.org.uk

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Ask students about what they are currently learning about.
  • Get your child to teach you something they have been taught.
  • Quiz your child on their learning.
  • Ask questions about any moral or ethical issues that might come up on the news e.g. Women in Leadership, Sexuality, Unethical Business Practices, etc.
  • Play devils advocate when discussing certain topics to get them to consider a range of perspectives.
  • Challenge their views and let them clearly justify with reasons and evidence their beliefs.
  • Provide a quiet environment or space for them to revise, make flash cards, posters, etc.
  • Time your child’s exam question practice.
  • Support them in creating a revision timetable.
  • Encourage your child to do wider reading around the subject to enhance their knowledge.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Ms A.Sheppard, Head of Religious Studies and Worship, Townsend Church of England School
Science - Biology

Course Details

A Level Biology A - H420, OCR

Course Description

Our new A Level in Biology A allows students to develop relevant practical skills alongside essential knowledge and understanding of a range of biological concepts and scientific methods. Biological mathematics and problem-solving skills can be fully integrated into teaching and learning.

Programme of Study

The following topics are studied in A level Biology:

Module 1: Development of Practical Skills

  • This unit includes the practical endorsement and is worked on throughout the two years of the course.

Year 12

Module 2: Foundations in Biology

  • Cell Structure
  • Biological Molecules
  • Nucleotides and Nucleic Acids
  • Enzymes
  • Biological Membranes
  • Cell Division and Organisation

Module 3: Exchange and Transport

  • Exchange and Transport in Animal and Plants

Module 4: Biodiversity, Evolution and Disease

  • Disease and the Immune Syste
  • Classification and Evolution
  • Biodiversity

Year 13

Module 5: Communication, Homeostasis and Energy

  • Communication and Homeostasis
  • Excretion
  • Animal Responses
  • Plant Responses and Hormones
  • Photosynthesis
  • Respiration

Module 6: Genetics, Evolution and Ecosystems

  • Cellular Control
  • Patterns of Inheritance
  • Evolution
  • Manipulating Genomes
  • Cloning and Biotechnology
  • Ecosystems
  • Populations and Sustainability
During year 13 pupils have the opportunity to complete the field study areas of the course and practical endorsements at the Crandedale Centre in Yorkshire. This is a compulsory trip that takes place in October. On the course pupils will learn a range of skills and use equipment that is unavailable to us at School as well as study habitats such as Rocky Shores and Moorland that we cannot access here. Whilst there we use this opportunity to study aspects of unit 6 in a practical setting including Ecosystems and Populations by comparing data collected during the day and Sustainability when looking at sustainable forestry and fishing. Cranedale centre: http://www.cranedale.com/ )

Assessment

Biological Processes Exam (01)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 37% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from modules 1,2,3 and 5

Biological Diversity Exam (02)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 37% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from modules 1,2,4 and 6

Unified Biology Exam (03)

  • 70 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 26% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from all modules (1-6)

Practical Endorsement in Biology (04)

  • Non-exam assessment

All components include synoptic assessment.

Students must complete all components (01, 02, 03, and 04) to be awarded the OCR A Level in Biology A.


Home Learning

Students are provided with regular extra reading and home learning tasks to consolidate their learning and exam questions to check understanding and progress as well as give ample opportunity to practice for the examinations and allow useful revision.

Where can Biology take you

Science can not only lead you down a broad range of careers and further study but it can lead you into lifelong passions and hobbies. Science is an absolute key player in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) subjects. Whilst people follow science careers because they feel like they have an affinity for science, or an ambition, or just pure interest in the sciences, it is common knowledge that the careers are some of the top paying and most respectable in the world, whether to be an Engineer, a Researcher, or a vital role in the NHS.

Further Study

  • Degrees in
    • Biology
    • Zoology
    • Animal Care
    • Veterinary Medicine
    • Biochemistry
    • Pharmacology
    • Medicine
    • Forensic Science
    • ..... and many more

Careers

  • Engineer
  • Researcher
  • Medicine
  • Marine Biology
  • Forensic Science
  • Conservation Biology and Ecology
  • Veterinarian Medicine

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can encourage their children to study and read outside of the lessons to both embellish and consolidate their learning.
  • Parents can regularly check Show My Homework to check homework and any other notices, and should also be reading the Parentmail sent out each week for any key information.
  • Parents can also encourage their children to be completing extra revision at home and ensuring students are equipped with pens, pencils, rulers and calculators for every science lesson as a minimum.

Useful Links

Textbooks

Many second hand copies are available on Amazon and are usually in very good condition

Revision Guides

  • CGP A Level Biology for OCR
  • CGP Head start to A Level Biology
  • CGP A Level Biology: Essential Maths Skills
All these books are available to purchase from your Biology Teachers

Websites


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss N. Guijarro, Head of Science, Townsend Church of England School
Science - Chemistry

Course Details

A Level Chemistry A - H432, OCR

Course Description

Our A Level Chemistry A qualification is a content-led course designed to develop theoretical and practical chemistry skills, knowledge and understanding.

Programme of Study

The following topics are studied in A level Chemistry:

Module 1: Development of Practical Skill

  • This unit includes the practical endorsement and is worked on throughout the two years of the course.

Year 12

Module 2: Foundations in Chemistry

  • Atomic Structure and Isotopes
  • Compounds Formulae and Equations
  • Amount of Substance
  • Electron Structure
  • Bonding and Structure
  • Acids
  • Redox
  • Enthalpy Changes

Module 3: Inorganic and Physical Chemistry

  • Periodicity
  • Group 2
  • The Halogens
  • Qualitative Analysis
  • Reaction Rates
  • Chemical Equilibrium

Module 4: Organic Chemistry

  • Alkanes
  • Alkenes
  • Alcohols
  • Haloalkanes
  • Organic Synthesis
  • Analytical Techniques
  • Organic Synthesis
  • Analytical Techniques

Year 13

Module 5: Physical and Inorganic Chemistry

  • How Fast (Rates)
  • How Far (Equilibria)
  • Acids, Bases and Buffers
  • Lattice Enthalpy
  • Entropy
  • Redox and Electrode Potentials
  • Transition Elements
  • Qualitative Analysis

Module 6: Organic Chemistry

  • Aromatic Compounds
  • Carbonyl Compounds
  • Carboxylic Acids and Esters
  • Amines
  • Amino Acids, Amides and Chirality
  • Polyesters and Polyamides
  • Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation
  • Organic Synthesis
  • Chromatography and Qualitative Analysis
  • Spectroscopy

Assessment

Periodic Table, Elements and Physical Chemistry Exam (01)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 37% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from modules 1,2,3 and 5

Synthesis and Analytical Techniques Exam (02)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 37% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from modules 1,2,4 and 6

Unified Chemistry (03)

  • 70 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 26% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from all modules (1-6)

Practical Endorsement in Chemistry (04)

  • Non-exam assessment

All components include synoptic assessment.

Students must complete all components (01, 02, 03, and 04) to be awarded the OCR A Level in Chemistry A.

Home Learning

Students are provided with regular extra reading and home learning tasks to consolidate their learning and exam questions to check understanding and progress as well as give ample opportunity to practice for the examinations and allow useful revision.

Where can Chemistry take you

Science can not only lead you down a broad range of careers and further study but it can lead you into lifelong passions and hobbies. Science is an absolute key player in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) subjects. Whilst people follow science careers because they feel like they have an affinity for science, or an ambition, or just pure interest in the sciences, it is common knowledge that the careers are some of the top paying and most respectable in the world, whether to be an Engineer, a Researcher, or a vital role in the NHS.

Further Study

  • Degrees in
    • Biochemistry
    • Medicine
    • Forensic Science
    • Veterinarian Medicine
    • Pharmacy
    • Environmental Sustainability
    • Health and Social Care
    • Engineering
    • Applied Science
    • ... and many more

Careers

  • Medicine
  • Forensic Science
  • Veterinarian Medicine
  • Working in industries such as GSK

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can encourage their children to study and read outside of the lessons to both embellish and consolidate their learning.
  • Parents can regularly check Show My Homework to check homework and any other notices, and should also be reading the Parentmail sent out each week for any key information.
  • Parents can also encourage their children to be completing extra revision at home and ensuring students are equipped with pens, pencils, rulers and calculators for every science lesson as a minimum.

Useful Links

Reading List

  • Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry by Philip Ball
  • The Periodic Table by Eric Scerri
  • Why Chemical Reactions Happen by James Keeler and Peter Wothers

Textbooks

  • Rob Ritchie and Dave Gent: A Level Chemistry A for OCR Student Book - Publisher: OUP Oxford ISBN-10: 0198351976
  • Eileen Ramsden A-Level Chemistry - Core Text Fourth Edition - Publisher: Nelson Thornes; ISBN-10: 0748752994
  • Lawrie Ryan Advanced Chemistry For You - Publisher: OUP Oxford; 2 edition (28 May 2015) ISBN-10: 1408527367

Magazine/Journals

Websites


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss N. Guijarro, Head of Science, Townsend Church of England School
Science - Physics

Course Details

A Level Physics A - H556, OCR

Course Description

Our A Level in Physics A, enables students to build on their knowledge of the laws of physics, applying their understanding to solve problems on topics ranging from subatomic particles to the entire universe. They also have the opportunity to develop all the relevant practical skills.

Programme of Study

The following topics are studied in A level Physics:

Module 1: Development of Practical Skills

  • This unit includes the practical endorsement and is worked on throughout the two years of the course.

Year 12

Module 2: Foundations in Physics

  • Quantities and Units
  • Derived Units
  • Scalar and Vector Quantities
  • Adding Vectors
  • Resolving Vectors
  • More on Vectors

Module 3: Forces and Motion

  • Motion
  • Forces in Action
  • Work, Energy, and Power
  • Materials
  • Laws of Motion and Momentum

Module 4: Electrons, Waves and Photons

  • Charge and Current
  • Energy, Power and Resistance
  • Electrical Circuits
  • Waves 1
  • Waves 2
  • Quantum Physics

Year 13

Module 5: Newtonian World and Astrophysics

  • Thermal Physics
  • Ideal Gases
  • Circular Motion
  • Oscillations
  • Gravitational Fields
  • Stars
  • Cosmology

Module 6: Particles and Medical Physics

  • Capacitance
  • Electric Fields
  • Magnetic Fields
  • Particle Physics
  • Radioactivity
  • Nuclear Physics
  • Medical Imaging

Assessment

Modelling Physics Exam (01)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 37% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from modules 1,2,3 and 5

Exploring Science Exam (02)

  • 100 marks
  • 2 hours 15 minutes
  • 37% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from modules 1,2,4 and 6

Unified Physics (03)

  • 70 marks
  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 26% of overall A level
  • Assesses content from all modules (1-6)

Practical Endorsement in Physics (04)

  • Non-exam assessment

All components include synoptic assessment.

Students must complete all components (01, 02, 03, and 04) to be awarded the OCR A Level in Physics A.

Home Learning

Students are provided with regular extra reading and home learning tasks to consolidate their learning and exam questions to check understanding and progress as well as give ample opportunity to practice for the examinations and allow useful revision.

Where can Physics take you

Science can not only lead you down a broad range of careers and further study but it can lead you into lifelong passions and hobbies. Science is an absolute key player in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) subjects. Whilst people follow science careers because they feel like they have an affinity for science, or an ambition, or just pure interest in the sciences, it is common knowledge that the careers are some of the top paying and most respectable in the world, whether to be an Engineer, a Researcher, or a vital role in the NHS.

Further Study

  • Degrees in:
    • Enginerring
    • Medicine
    • Research
    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Electrical Engineering
    • Computer Science
    • Applied Science
    • ... and many more

Careers

  • Medicine
  • Research
  • Mechanical engineering
  • Working in industries such as MBDA and GSK

How can parents support their child's learning

  • Parents can encourage their children to study and read outside of the lessons to both embellish and consolidate their learning.
  • Parents can regularly check Show My Homework to check homework and any other notices, and should also be reading the Parentmail sent out each week for any key information.
  • Parents can also encourage their children to be completing extra revision at home and ensuring students are equipped with pens, pencils, rulers and calculators for every science lesson as a minimum.

Useful Links

Textbooks

Revision Guides

  • CGP Head start to A Level Physics
  • CGP A Level Physics: Essential Maths Skills
  • CGP A Level Physics for OCR
All these books are available to purchase from your Physics Teachers

Websites


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Miss N. Guijarro, Head of Science, Townsend Church of England School
Sociology

Course Details

A Level Sociology, AQA

Course Description

The study of Sociology focuses on contemporary society and fosters the development of critical and reflective thinking with a respect for social diversity. It provides an awareness of the importance of social structure and social action in explaining social issues. Students are encouraged to develop their own sociological awareness through active engagement with the contemporary social world. The course has been designed with the clear objective of addressing the requirements above and will encourage students to:
  • acquire knowledge and a critical understanding of contemporary social processes and social changes
  • appreciate the significance of theoretical and conceptual issues in sociological debate
  • understand and evaluate sociological methodology and a range of research methods through active involvement in the research process
  • develop skills that enable individuals to focus on their personal identity, roles and responsibilities within society
  • develop a lifelong interest in social issues.

Programme of Study

Over the course of the two year course students will gain an understanding of the working of contemporary western (largely Britain and American) society. They will do so via the study of social structures, institutions and phenomena. These include; the education system, the family, the media and the criminal justice system. There are 3 examination papers:
  • Paper 1 – Education and theory and methods
  • Paper 2 – The Family and Media
  • Paper 3 – Crime and Deviance, theory and methods
As well as the specific connect mentioned above the course requires students to understand and number of integral elements and core themes. These are aspects of sociology or society that students must explore whatever their chosen areas of study. They are: Integral elements All the following must be an integral part of the study of each topic area:
  • sociological theories, perspectives and methods
  • the design of the research used to obtain the data under consideration, including its strengths and limitations.
  • links between topic areas studied.
Core themes Students must study the following two core themes:
  • socialisation, culture and identity
  • social differentiation, power and stratification.
  • the significance of conflict and consensus, social structure and social action, and the role of values.

Year 12

  • Introduction to Sociology
  • Family and Education
  • Research Methods
  • Sociological Theory

Year 13

  • Crime and Deviance
  • Media
  • Media and Theory

Assessment

Students are assessed across three examination papers and by three assessment objectives. These are:

 AO1 - Knowledge and Understanding

  • sociological theories, concepts and evidence
  • sociological methods

AO2 - Application

  • sociological theories, concepts and evidence
  • Research methods

AO3 - Analysis and Evaluation

  • sociological theories, concepts, evidence
  • research methods in order to
    • present arguments
    • make judgements
    • draw conclusions

Paper 1 - Education with Theory and Methods

  • 80 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 33.3% of overall A level

Paper 2 - Topics in Sociology

  • 80 marks
  • 2 hours
  • 33.3% of overall A level
  • Paper 3 - Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods

    • 80 marks
    • 2 hours
    • 33.3% of overall A level

Home Learning

Students are expected to complete all work in line with the home learning policy as well as take an active interest in contemporary issues in society.

Where can Sociology take you

The skills that are taught in Sociology are valued in a number of areas. Throughout the course students are encouraged to begin to learn about how to conduct research. With further study this could lead to work conducting research for the government, for large multinational companies and for charities. We are proud that students completing the course often report that it has “opened their eyes” or that they now see the world in a different way.

Further Study

  • Degrees in:
    • Sociology
    • Anthropology
    • Communication, Media and Culture
    • Criminology
    • Education Studies
    • international Relations
    • Philosophy
    • Politics

Careers

  • Education Sector
  • Criminal Justice System
  • Social Care Sector
  • Media

How can parents support their child's learning

Parents should encourage their children to be curious, to question inequality in all its forms, to consider where are norms, values and practices come from and to keep up to date with contemporary issues.

Useful Links


FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT

Head of Sociology, Townsend Church of England School